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that were conducted to investigate the effect of track surface on the remodeling response of proximal sesamoid bones 12 and third metacarpal bones 13 of 2-year-old Thoroughbred racehorses during training. Epidemiology of exercise

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate gene expression of the major proteolytic systems and growth regulators in skeletal muscle of horses with myopathy associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID).

Animals—14 horses with PPID-associated myopathy and 7 healthy control horses.

Procedures—Horses with PPID and controls were age matched (15 to 28 years old). Muscle biopsy specimens were collected from both groups and processed for RNA and cDNA extraction. Validation of the most stable housekeeping genes for skeletal muscle was performed and used to compare gene expression of the following proteolytic systems: cysteine aspartate protease–dependent systems (caspases), lysosomal-dependent systems (cathepsins), non–lysosomal calcium protease–dependent systems (calpains), and ubiquitin-proteasome–dependent systems (ubiquitins). Gene expression of negative regulators of muscle growth (myostatin and inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α) was also determined.

Results—No significant difference between groups was detected in expression of the major proteolytic systems except for m-calpain, which was greater in horses with PPID. No differences in gene expression of myostatin and interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were detected between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Greater expression of m-calpain may suggest that calpains play an important role in development of muscle atrophy in horses with PPID. However, because posttranslational events may alter protein activation, inactivation, and functions not studied here, other mechanisms of muscle atrophy cannot be excluded.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop and psychometrically test an owner self-administered questionnaire designed to assess severity and impact of chronic pain in dogs with osteoarthritis.

Sample Population—70 owners of dogs with osteoarthritis and 50 owners of clinically normal dogs.

Procedures—Standard methods for the stepwise development and testing of instruments designed to assess subjective states were used. Items were generated through focus groups and an expert panel. Items were tested for readability and ambiguity, and poorly performing items were removed. The reduced set of items was subjected to factor analysis, reliability testing, and validity testing.

Results—Severity of pain and interference with function were 2 factors identified and named on the basis of the items contained in them. Cronbach's α was 0.93 and 0.89, respectively, suggesting that the items in each factor could be assessed as a group to compute factor scores (ie, severity score and interference score). The test-retest analysis revealed κ values of 0.75 for the severity score and 0.81 for the interference score. Scores correlated moderately well (r = 0.51 and 0.50, respectively) with the overall quality-of-life (QOL) question, such that as severity and interference scores increased, QOL decreased. Clinically normal dogs had significantly lower severity and interference scores than dogs with osteoarthritis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A psychometrically sound instrument was developed. Responsiveness testing must be conducted to determine whether the questionnaire will be useful in reliably obtaining quantifiable assessments from owners regarding the severity and impact of chronic pain and its treatment on dogs with osteoarthritis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs.

Animals—104 companion dogs.

Procedures—While wearing an activity monitor, each dog was led through a series of standard activities: lying down, walking laps, trotting laps, and trotting up and down stairs. Linear regression analysis was used to determine which signalment and body conformation factors were associated with activity counts.

Results—There was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts when dogs were lying down, walking laps, and trotting laps. However, when dogs were trotting up and down stairs, there was a significant effect of age and body weight such that, for every 1-kg increase in body weight, there was a 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 2.4%) decrease in activity counts and for every 1-year increase in age, there was a 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.4% to 6.9%) decrease in activity counts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—When activity was well controlled, there was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts recorded by the activity monitor. However, when activity was less controlled, older dogs and larger dogs had lower activity counts than younger and smaller dogs. The wide range in body conformation (eg, limb or body length) among dogs did not appear to significantly impact the activity counts recorded by the monitor, but age and body weight did and must be considered in analysis of data collected from the monitors.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the accuracy of pressure plate kinetic asymmetry indices (ASIs) for diagnosis of unilateral hind limb lameness in dogs and their correlation with visual gait assessment (VGA) scores.

Animals—9 healthy dogs and 16 dogs with previously diagnosed unilateral rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament and concurrent unilateral hind limb lameness.

Procedures—Dogs were walked over a pressure plate to determine paw contact area (PCA), peak vertical pressure (PVP), peak vertical force (PVF), and vertical impulse (VI) of both hind limbs. An ASI was calculated for each gait variable. Simultaneously, gait was assessed visually and scored by use of a numeric rating scale (0 to 10). The ASI of each variable was tested for its usefulness in discrimination between lame and nonlame dogs and for correlation with VGA scores.

Results—Sensitivity and specificity of ASIs to discriminate between lame and nonlame dogs were excellent for PVF, VI, and PCA; these values were substantially lower for ASI of PVP. Cutoff values to discriminate between lame and nonlame dogs were determined by use of ASIs for PVF, VI, and PCA; however, this could not be done for ASI of PVP. Correlations between ASIs of PVF, VI, and PCA and VGA scores were higher than correlation between the ASIs of PVP and VGA scores.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ASIs of PVF and VI determined via analysis of pressure plate measurements were reliable indicators of clinical lameness in dogs, but the ASI of PVP was not. The ASI of PCA is an interesting new variable for assessment of limb loading symmetry.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop a practical ultrasonography-guided injection approach to anesthetic blockade of the femoral nerve in calves and to assess the method's accuracy.

Animals—13 cadavers of 4-week-old male Holstein Friesian calves.

Procedures—Detailed topographic and anatomic cross-sectional evaluation of the relevant topography in 3 cadavers was performed to identify optimal injection approaches to the femoral nerve. Three approaches (ventral paravertebral, dorsal paravertebral, and ileal) were evaluated by simulated ultrasonography-guided perineural injection of methylene blue dye in 10 cadavers. Ultrasonographic image quality, number of needle redirections required for correct needle positioning, and injection success as defined through a 3-point grading system were recorded.

Results—The dorsal paravertebral approach yielded the best results, compared with the ileal and ventral paravertebral approaches, to properly and adequately stain the targeted nerve.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The dorsal paravertebral injection technique appeared to be the best choice for performing a femoral nerve block in calves, although this technique will need to be further evaluated in live calves to determine its effectiveness and clinical usefulness. Diagnostic perineural anesthesia of the femoral nerve in cattle might be helpful in identifying quadriceps muscle involvement in those with complex spastic paresis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the distribution for limbs and bones in horses with fractures of the proximal sesamoid bones and relationships with findings on palmarodorsal radiographic images.

Sample Population—Proximal sesamoid bones obtained from both forelimbs of cadavers of 328 racing Thoroughbreds.

Procedure—Osteophytes; large vascular channels; and fracture location, orientation, configuration, and margin distinctness were categorized by use of high-detail contact palmarodorsal radiographs. Distributions of findings were determined. Relationships between radiographic findings and fracture characteristics were examined by use of χ2 and logistic regression techniques.

Results—Fractures were detected in 136 (41.5%) horses. Biaxial fractures were evident in 109 (80%) horses with a fracture. Osteophytes and large vascular channels were evident in 266 (81%) and 325 (99%) horses, respectively. Medial bones typically had complete transverse or split transverse simple fractures, indistinct fracture margins, > 1 vascular channel that was > 1 mm in width, and osteophytes in abaxial wing and basilar middle or basilar abaxial locations. Lateral bones typically had an oblique fracture and distinct fracture margins. Odds of proximal sesamoid bone fracture were approximately 2 to 5 times higher in bones without radiographic evidence of osteophytes or large vascular channels, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Biaxial fractures of proximal sesamoid bones were common in cadavers of racing Thoroughbreds. Differences between medial and lateral bones for characteristics associated with fracture may relate to differences in fracture pathogeneses for these bones. Osteophytes and vascular channels were common findings; however, fractures were less likely to occur in bones with these features.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

epidemiology of fatal fractures of the distal limb in racing thoroughbreds, in Proceedings . 13th Int Conf Racing Analysts Vets 2000 ; 278 – 283 . 10. Oikawa M Uueda Y Inada S , et al . Effect of restructuring of a racetrack on the occurrence

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

.1016/0301-6226(88)90013-9 13 Aschengrau A Seage GR III . Chapter 3. Comparing disease frequencies . In: Essentials of epidemiology in public health . Sudbury, Mass : Jones and Bartlett Publishers Inc , 2003 ; 58 – 73 . 14 Grindflek E

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Inc, Natick, Mass. References 1. USDA APHIS Veterinary Services . Lameness and laminitis in horses . Fort Collins, Colo : Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health, National Animal Health Monitoring Systems, USDA , 2000 . 2. USDA APHIS

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research