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been able to establish that metagenomic approaches may be valuable in understanding the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in food animals. a. QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, Qiagen, Valencia, Calif. b. Multiplex PCR kit, Qiagen, Valencia

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments.

ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, hawks were randomly assigned to first receive voriconazole (15 mg/kg, PO) injected into a dead mouse (n = 3; fed birds) or without food (4; unfed birds). Sixteen days later, treatments were reversed. Blood samples were collected at various points to measure plasma voriconazole concentrations by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and fit to a compartmental model through nonlinear mixed-effects regression, with feeding status and body weight investigated as covariates.

RESULTS Voriconazole was well absorbed, with quantifiable plasma concentrations up to 24 hours after administration. Mean plasma half-life was approximately 2 hours in fed and unfed birds. Administration of the voriconazole in food delayed absorption, resulting in a significant delay in time to maximum plasma concentration. The final compartmental model included a categorical covariate to account for this lag in absorption as well as body weight as a covariate of total body clearance (relative to unknown bioavailability).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A single dose of voriconazole (15 mg/kg) administered PO to red-tailed hawks resulted in mean plasma voriconazole concentrations greater than the targeted value (1 μg/mL). Additional studies with larger sample sizes and multidose regimens are required before the model developed here can be applied in clinical settings.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Shaw DJ , et al. Acquisition and epidemiology of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in a cohort of newborn calves . J Antimicrob Chemother 2004 ; 53 : 867 – 871 . 10.1093/jac/dkh177 17. Casewell M , Friis C , Marco E , et al. The

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects following SC administration of ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) in New Zealand White rabbits.

ANIMALS 6 adult sexually intact female New Zealand White rabbits.

PROCEDURES Each rabbit was administered 40 mg of CCFA/kg SC. A blood sample was obtained immediately before (0 minutes), at 5 and 30 minutes after, and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 95, 120, 144, and 168 hours after administration, and plasma concentrations of ceftiofur free acid equivalents (CFAE) were measured. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. For each rabbit, body weight, food consumption, fecal output, and injection site were monitored. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for 293 bacterial isolates from rabbit clinical samples were determined.

RESULTS Mean ± SD peak plasma concentration of CFAE and time to maximum plasma concentration were 33.13 ± 10.15 μg/mL and 1.75 ± 0.42 hours, respectively. The mean terminal half-life of CFAE was 42.6 ± 5.2 hours. Plasma CFAE concentration was > 4 μg/mL for approximately 24 hours and > 1 μg/mL for at least 72 hours after CCFA administration. An apparently nonpainful subcutaneous nodule developed at the injection site in 3 of 6 rabbits.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that CCFA (40 mg/kg) could be administered SC every 24 to 72 hours to New Zealand White rabbits to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Single-dose administration of CCFA resulted in minimal adverse effects. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the effects of repeated CCFA administration in New Zealand White rabbits.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics and adverse effects after voriconazole administration to cats and identify an oral dose of voriconazole for cats that maintains plasma drug concentrations within a safe and effective range.

ANIMALS 6 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES Voriconazole (1 mg/kg, IV) was administered to each cat (phase 1). Serial plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured for 24 hours after administration. Voriconazole suspension or tablets were administered orally at 4, 5, or 6 mg/kg (phase 2). Plasma voriconazole concentrations were measured for 24 hours after administration. Pharmacokinetics of tablet and suspension preparations was compared. Finally, an induction dose of 25 mg/cat (4.1 to 5.4 mg/kg, tablet formulation), PO, was administered followed by 12.5 mg/cat (2.05 to 2.7 mg/kg), PO, every 48 hours for 14 days (phase 3). Plasma voriconazole concentration was measured on days 2, 4, 8, and 15.

RESULTS Voriconazole half-life after IV administration was approximately 12 hours. Maximal plasma concentration was reached within 60 minutes after oral administration. A dose of 4 mg/kg resulted in plasma concentrations within the target range (1 to 4 μg/mL). Adverse effects included hypersalivation and miosis. During long-term administration, plasma concentrations remained in the target range but increased, which suggested drug accumulation.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Voriconazole had excellent oral bioavailability and a long half-life in cats. Oral administration of a dose of 12.5 mg/cat every 72 hours should be investigated. Miosis occurred when plasma concentrations reached the high end of the target range. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring should be considered to minimize adverse effects.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetic properties of 1 IM injection of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) in American black ducks (Anas rubripes).

Animals—20 adult American black ducks (6 in a preliminary experiment and 14 in a primary experiment).

Procedures—Dose and route of administration of CCFA for the primary experiment were determined in a preliminary experiment. In the primary experiment, CCFA (10 mg/kg, IM) was administered to ducks. Ducks were allocated into 2 groups, and blood samples were obtained 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 48, 96, 144, 192, and 240 hours or 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 72, 120, 168, and 216 hours after administration of CCFA. Plasma concentrations of ceftiofur free acid equivalents (CFAEs) were determined by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Data were evaluated by use of a naive pooled-data approach.

Results—The area under the plasma concentration versus time curve from 0 hours to infinity was 783 h•μg/mL, maximum plasma concentration observed was 13.1 μg/mL, time to maximum plasma concentration observed was 24 hours, terminal phase half-life was 32.0 hours, time that concentrations of CFAEs were higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (1.0 μg/mL) for many pathogens of birds was 123 hours, and time that concentrations of CFAEs were higher than the target plasma concentration (4.0 μg/mL) was 73.3 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—On the basis of the time that CFAE concentrations were higher than the target plasma concentration, a dosing interval of 3 days can be recommended for future multidose CCFA studies.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics of danofloxacin following IM administration of a single dose (10 mg/kg) in koi (Cyprinus carpio).

ANIMALS

69 healthy adult koi housed in a 980-L flow-through-system tank.

PROCEDURES

3 fish were kept as untreated controls, and the remaining 66 fish were assigned to 11 treatment groups with 6 fish/group. Fish in the treatment groups were given a single dose of danofloxacin (10 mg/kg) IM in the left epaxial musculature. Fifteen, 30, and 45 minutes and 1, 4, 12, 24, 72, 96, 120, and 144 hours after administration of danofloxacin, fish in each treatment group were euthanized, and blood samples and samples of liver, spleen, gill, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, skin and muscle, and scales were collected. Plasma and tissue drug concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Tissues from the untreated control fish and fish euthanized 144 hours after danofloxacin administration were examined histologically.

RESULTS

Maximum plasma concentration (mean, 8,315.7 ng/mL) was reached approximately 45 minutes after danofloxacin administration; plasma elimination half-life was 15 hours. Danofloxacin was detected in all examined tissues from all 6 fish euthanized 15 minutes after drug administration and was detected in some tissues from 3 of the 6 fish euthanized 144 hours after drug administration. For all tissues, results of histologic examination were unremarkable.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

IM administration of a single dose (10 mg/kg) of danofloxacin in koi resulted in rapid absorption, with maximum plasma concentration reached approximately 45 minutes after drug administration; the drug could still be detected in some tissues 144 hours after administration.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether prophylactic administration of valacyclovir hydrochloride versus initiation of treatment at the onset of fever would differentially protect horses from viral replication and clinical disease attributable to equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) infection.

ANIMALS 18 aged mares.

PROCEDURES Horses were randomly assigned to receive an oral placebo (control), treatment at detection of fever, or prophylactic treatment (initiated 1 day prior to viral challenge) and then inoculated intranasally with a neuropathogenic strain of EHV-1. Placebo or valacyclovir was administered orally for 7 or 14 days after EHV-1 inoculation or detection of fever (3 horses/group). Effects of treatment on viral replication and clinical disease were evaluated. Plasma acyclovir concentrations and viremia were assessed to determine inhibitory concentrations of valacyclovir.

RESULTS Valacyclovir administration decreased shedding of virus and viremia, compared with findings for control horses. Rectal temperatures and clinical disease scores in horses that received valacyclovir prophylactically for 2 weeks were lower than those in control horses. The severity of but not the risk for ataxia was decreased by valacyclovir administration. Viremia was decreased when steady-state trough plasma acyclovir concentrations were > 0.8 μg/mL, supporting the time-dependent activity of acyclovir.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Valacyclovir treatment significantly decreased viral replication and signs of disease in EHV-1–infected horses; effects were greatest when treatment was initiated before viral inoculation, but treatment was also effective when initiated as late as 2 days after inoculation. During an outbreak of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy, antiviral treatment may be initiated in horses at various stages of infection, including horses that have not yet developed signs of viral disease.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Epidemiology of America . Clin Infect Dis 2016 ; 62 : e51 – e77 . 10.1093/cid/ciw118 55. Bush K . Beta-lactam antibiotics: penicillins . In: Finch RG Greenwood D Whitley RJ , et al, eds. Antibiotic and chemotherapy . 9th ed

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Milford, Mass. g. C18 filter frit guard column, Phenomenex, Torrance, Calif. h. Phoenix WinNonlin, version 6.3, Pharsight, Certara, Princeton, NJ. References 1. Rougier S Galland D Boucher S , et al. Epidemiology and susceptibility of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research