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; 207 : 186 – 190 . 6. Bauman AE Russell SJ Furber SE , et al. The epidemiology of dog walking: an unmet need for human and canine health . Med J Aust 2001 ; 175 : 632 – 634 . 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2001.tb143757.x 7. Robertson ID . The

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine cytologic and microbiologic findings in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and SpO 2 values obtained during BAL in healthy rabbits.

Animals—9 rabbits.

Procedures—Bronchoscopic BAL of left and right caudal lobar bronchi (LB2 and RB4) was performed with 3 mL of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution; SpO 2 was measured before, during, and after BAL. Percentage fluid recovered, total leukocyte counts, and differential cell counts were determined. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial, mycoplasmal, and fungal cultures were performed from combined LB2 and RB4 samples.

Results—Mean ± SD percentage fluid volumes recovered from LB2 and RB4 were 53 ± 13% and 63 ± 13%, respectively. Mean ± SD total leukocyte counts from LB2 and RB4 were 422 ± 199 cells/μL and 378 ± 97 cells/μL, respectively. Macrophages were most frequently identified. There were no significant differences in volumes retrieved, total leukocyte counts, or differential cell percentages between LB2 and RB4. Microbial culture results were negative for 3 rabbits and positive for mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacterial growth in 6 and 2 rabbits, respectively. The SpO 2 was ≥ 95% in 7 of 9 rabbits after anesthetic induction, < 95% in 5 of 6 rabbits 1 minute after BAL, and ≥ 95% in 5 of 9 rabbits and > 90% in 4 of 9 rabbits 3 minutes after BAL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bronchoscopic BAL with 3 mL of saline solution provided adequate fluid recovery for microbiologic and cytologic examination from the caudal lung lobes. Transient low SpO 2 was detected immediately after BAL.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine fluid retention, glomerular filtration rate, and urine output in dogs anesthetized for a surgical orthopedic procedure.

Animals—23 dogs treated with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy.

Procedures—12 dogs were used as a control group. Cardiac output was measured in 5 dogs, and 6 dogs received carprofen for at least 14 days. Dogs received oxymorphone, atropine, propofol, and isoflurane for anesthesia (duration, 4 hours). Urine and blood samples were obtained for analysis every 30 minutes. Lactated Ringer's solution was administered at 10 mL/kg/h. Urine output was measured and glomerular filtration rate was estimated. Fluid retention was measured by use of body weight, fluid balance, and bioimpedance spectroscopy.

Results—No difference was found among control, cardiac output, or carprofen groups, so data were combined. Median urine output and glomerular filtration rate were 0.46 mL/kg/h and 1.84 mL/kg/min. Dogs retained a large amount of fluids during anesthesia, as indicated by increased body weight, positive fluid balance, increased total body water volume, and increased extracellular fluid volume. The PCV, total protein concentration, and esophageal temperature decreased in a linear manner.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs anesthetized for a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy retained a large amount of fluids, had low urinary output, and had decreased PCV, total protein concentration, and esophageal temperature. Evaluation of urine output alone in anesthetized dogs may not be an adequate indicator of fluid balance.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare 2 methods for estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), study the effects of age and body size on GFR estimates, and provide a reference range for estimated GFR in clinically normal cats.

Animals—57 cats.

Procedures—In each cat, GFR was estimated via plasma clearance of iohexol and creatinine. Results of a 1-compartmental model (CL1comp) were calibrated to a trapezoidal method estimate (CLtrap) by use of a correction formula applicable to dogs or humans and standardized to body weight; for iohexol clearance, data were also standardized to extracellular fluid volume (ECFV). For all 57 cats, method comparison was performed via agreement analysis. Reference ranges for GFR derived by the different methods were established by use of data from a subset of 51 cats after exclusion of 6 cats that were azotemic, Birman, or both.

Results—In 57 cats, mean CLtrap of creatinine was 0.29 mL/min/kg (13%) higher than CLtrap of iohexol. In 51 nonazotemic cats, mean CLtrap was 2.26 mL/min/kg for iohexol (reference range, 1.02 to 3.50 mL/min/kg) and 2.55 mL/min/kg for creatinine (reference range, 1.27 to 3.83 mL/min/kg). Values of GFR/kg or GFR standardized to liters of ECFV did not decrease with increasing age. A negative linear relationship was detected between body weight and estimated GFR/kg or GFR standardized to liters of ECFV.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reference ranges for estimated GFR via plasma clearance of iohexol and creatinine should facilitate early detection of impaired renal function in cats, although body weight should be taken into account.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To optimize the use of CT-guided modeling for the calculation of body surface area (BSA) in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

Animals—12 domestic rabbits.

Procedures—Adult rabbits (body weight, 1 to > 4 kg) that were client-owned animals undergoing CT for disease diagnosis or deceased laboratory animals donated from other research projects were scanned with a CT scanner. Images were transferred to a radiation therapy planning software program. Image slices were captured as contiguous slices at 100 kVp and 100 mA and processed to 0.1-cm-thick sections. The length of each contoured slice was summed to calculate a final BSA measurement. Nonlinear regression analysis was then used to derive an equation for the calculation of BSA in rabbits.

Results—The constant calculated by use of this method was 9.9 (range, 9.59 to 10). The R 2 for the goodness of fit was 0.9332. The equation that best described BSA as a function of body weight for domestic rabbits with this method was as follows: BSA = (9.9 × [body weight {in grams}]2/3)/10,000.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The BSA calculated via the CT-guided method yielded results similar to those obtained with equations for other similarly sized mammals and verified the use of such equations for rabbits. Additionally, this technique can be used for species that lack equations for the accurate calculation of BSA.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on morphology and compliance of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) by use of impedance planimetry in healthy dogs and to quantify the effect of changes in IAP.

ANIMALS 7 healthy, purpose-bred sexually intact male hound-cross dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized, and cross-sectional area (CSA), minimal diameter (MD), LES length, LES volume, and distensibility index (DI) of the LES were evaluated by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe. For each dog, measurements were obtained before (baseline) and after creation of a pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 4, 8, and 15 mm Hg. Order of the IAPs was determined by use of a randomization software program.

RESULTS CSA and MD at 4 and 8 mm Hg were not significantly different from baseline measurements; however, CSA and MD at 15 mm Hg were both significantly greater than baseline measurements. The LES length and LES volume did not differ significantly from baseline measurements at any IAP. The DI differed inconsistently from the baseline measurement but was not substantially affected by IAP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pneumoperitoneum created with an IAP of 4 or 8 mm Hg did not significantly alter LES morphology in healthy dogs. Pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 15 mm Hg caused a significant increase in CSA and MD of the LES. Compliance of the LES as measured by the DI was not greatly altered by pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of up to 15 mm Hg.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To validate the use of high-resolution manometry (HRM) in awake, healthy dogs and compare the effects of bolus type (liquid vs solid) and drug treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution [SS] vs cisapride) on esophageal pressure profiles.

ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each dog received SS (10 mL) IV, and HRM was performed during oral administration of 10 boluses (5 mL each) of water or 10 boluses (5 g each) of canned food. Cisapride (1 mg/kg in 60 mL of SS) was subsequently administered IV to 7 dogs; HRM and bolus administration procedures were repeated. Two to 4 weeks later, HRM was repeated following administration of SS and water and food boluses in 4 dogs. Pressure profile data were obtained for all swallows, and 11 outcome variables were statistically analyzed.

RESULTS After SS administration, predicted means for the esophageal contractile integral were 850.4 cm/mm Hg/s for food boluses and 660.3 cm/mm Hg/s for water boluses. Predicted means for esophageal contraction front velocity were 6.2 cm/s for water boluses and 5.6 cm/s for food boluses after SS administration. Predicted means for residual LES pressure were significantly higher following cisapride administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM was feasible and repeatable in awake healthy dogs of various breeds and sizes. Stronger esophageal contractions and faster esophageal contraction velocity occurred during solid bolus and liquid bolus swallows, respectively. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly following cisapride administration. Esophageal contractions and bolus transit latency should be further evaluated by HRM in clinically dysphagic dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Woldehiwet Z , et al. Epidemiology of bovine venereal campylobacteriosis: geographic distribution and recent advances in molecular diagnostic techniques . Reprod Domest Anim 2010 ; 45 : e221 – e230 . 2. World Organisation for Animal Health

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Epidemiology of teat lesions in a dairy herd. II. Association with subclinical mastitis . Nord Vet Mea 1986 ; 38 : 220 – 232 . 5. Weaver AD St Jean G Steiner A . Teat surgery . In: Weaver AD St Jean G Steiner A , eds. Bovine surgery

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research