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Abstract

Objective—To survey faculty and house officers of clinical departments of colleges of veterinary medicine (CVM) to identify characteristics of sexual harassment (SH) in the veterinary academic environment, to report the opinions of survey respondents on how SH is being handled, and to determine how the process can be improved at veterinary academic institutions.

Procedure—On the basis of lists obtained from 25 CVM, a survey was mailed to 1,294 academic veterinarians. Four hundred seventy-eight completed surveys were returned.

Results—The prevalence of SH in the population of respondents was 31%. Nonphysical forms of SH were reported 6 times as often as physical forms of harassment, with the most common type reported being offensive sexual comments and unwanted attention. Fear of reprisal was the most prevalent reason cited by respondents for not confronting the harasser. Survey respondents rated the following as very important to improve the system of dealing with SH at their academic institution: guarantee of protection from retaliation, assurance of confidentiality, clear explanation of what will happen to you, and a clearer definition of SH.

Conclusion—A clear definition of SH is the first step in preventing SH. Other cited steps include professional development programs to educate the academic population as to what constitutes SH, inform the entire academic population what the institution's SH policy is, and enforce this policy with sensitivity, fairness, confidentiality, and quick resolve to protect the victim. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:1406–1409)

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as $18,200. 4 Children are the most likely people to be bitten by dogs, 5–8 and males are more likely to be bitten than females. 9,10 Scholars have acknowledged that the environment in which a dog lives impacts the dog's propensity to bite

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reveal that positive team environments enhance job satisfaction, improve well-being, and provide better role clarity for employees. 2,3 Conversely, negative team environments have been associated with team members becoming stressed, frustrated, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

influence prescribing practices, mentee education, or acceptance of antimicrobial stewardship programs. Veterinary teaching hospitals provide a unique environment to influence graduate and postgraduate clinical veterinary education and opinions about

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Exploring professional quality of life provides information that could be used to develop strategies that support care providers with potential benefits for the work and home environments. 13 Another critical outcome is job satisfaction, which in health

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

frequently cited included providing information in a frank and forthright manner; in multiple formats; in understandable language; in an unrushed environment wherein staff took the time to listen, answer all questions, and repeat what was needed; on a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

practices and identify resistant bacteria in the patient population and hospital environment. Infectious disease physicians and pharmacists oversee these programs and provide their expertise to counsel clinicians on best practices in antimicrobial

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,19–21 Chemical agents used in veterinary practice, including topical medications, hormones, pesticides, disinfectants, and antineoplastic agents, can pose mild to severe health hazards to those handling them. 8,9,22 Environments in which animals are kept can

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, whether LGBTQ+ veterinarians have a higher risk for these outcomes, compared with their heterosexual, cisgender counterparts, is currently unknown. Certain experiences of LGBTQ+ individuals are common across environments. For example, the decision to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association