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Abstract

Objective—To compare whole-body phenylalanine kinetics and the abundance of factors in signaling pathways associated with skeletal muscle protein synthesis and protein breakdown between horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) and age-matched control horses without PPID.

Animals—12 aged horses (6 horses with PPID and 6 control horses; mean age, 25.0 and 25.7 years, respectively).

Procedures—Plasma glucose, insulin, and amino acids concentrations were determined before and 90 minutes after feeding. Gluteal muscle biopsy samples were obtained from horses 90 minutes after feeding, and the abundance and activation of factors involved in signaling pathways of muscle protein synthesis and breakdown were determined. The next day, horses received a priming dose and 2 hours of a constant rate infusion of 13C sodium bicarbonate followed by a priming dose and 4 hours of a constant rate infusion of 1-13C phenylalanine IV; whole-body protein synthesis was determined.

Results—Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were higher after feeding than they were before feeding for both groups of horses; however, no significant postprandial increase in plasma amino acids concentrations was detected for either group. Phenylalanine flux, oxidation, release from protein breakdown, and nonoxidative disposal were not significantly different between groups. No significant effect of PPID status was detected on the abundance or activation of positive or negative regulators of protein synthesis or positive regulators of protein breakdown.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested that whole-body phenylalanine kinetics and the postprandial activation of signaling pathways that regulate protein synthesis and breakdown in muscles were not affected by PPID status alone in aged horses.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

There is increasing interest in assessing the behaviors of companion dogs in their routine environment, at home with their owners, and many of these behaviors are associated with a dog's degree of activity. 1–3 Mobility and spontaneous activity

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cows be housed in a clean environment and waste be intensively managed; thus, hard and slick flooring surfaces pervade for mature lactating cows. Consequently, focus should be placed on the rearing practices of young replacement heifers to identify

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-technology environment. An additional goal was to evaluate morphological measurements and body weight as potential predictors of mobility trial speeds. We hypothesized that morphological measurements collected by minimally trained owners and trained investigators would

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Footnotes a. Excel, version 16.32, Microsoft Corp, Redmond, Wash. b. R: A language and environment for statistical computing, version 3.5.3, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. References 1. International Committee on

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Team user manual. R: a language and environment for statistical computing . Vienna, Austria: R Foundation for Statistical Computing, 2004. References 1. Rumph P Lander J Kincaid S , et al . Ground reaction force profiles from force

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

acetate, triamcinolone acetonide, and isoflupredone acetate on equine articular tissue cocultures in an inflammatory environment . Am J Vet Res 2018 ; 79 : 933 – 940 . 10.2460/ajvr.79.9.933 18. Sherman SL , James C , Stoker AM , In vivo

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the temporary increases in rectal temperatures in these dogs were more likely environment or behavior related, rather than secondary to true disease. Similarly, in the present study, some alterations in the patellar, cranial tibial, withdrawal, and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, uninjured tendon. 1 Tendon healing is further hindered by the low vascularity and cellularity of tendons, low number of progenitor cells, and mechanical stress inherent to the local tissue environment. 2,3 Ligament or tendon injury that is extensive

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

horses in the present study became accustomed to their handlers in their new environment during training and less responsive to encouragement to increase their speed during the SETs. Their apparent willingness and aptitude for galloping at high speed were

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research