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a dirty ocean The connections between the health of humans, animals, and the environments in which they live have been well recognized and have recently been referred to as one health, one medicine. An example of the interconnectedness of human

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

samples contained Salmonella enterica . Results suggest that there is a risk of foodborne illness in dogs fed raw meat diets and in humans associated with these dogs or their environment. Unilateral uveitis in a dog with uveodermatologic syndrome 543

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dogs to a variety of environments and frequent handling by multiple individuals. Dogs were treated with fenbendazole on study days 1 through 10. On day 5, dogs were bathed and moved into clean, disinfected kennels to allow for disinfection and drying of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JAVMA News Veterinary colleges have created inclusive environments with few incidents of harassment or negative comments toward groups that remain underrepresented, a recent study indicates. Leaders in veterinary academia and the broader

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in which all 4 variables were measured in 30 dogs while in their home environment and after transport to a veterinary hospital, significant differences in rectal temperature, pulse rate, and blood pressure were identified, and the number of dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that communication style not only facilitates comprehension but also creates a humanistic environment. See page 785 Progressive vacuolar hepatopathy in Scottish Terriers with and without hepatocellular carcinoma Glycogen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injured by a needle or other sharp object. A greater proportion of technicians (42%; 155/365) than veterinarians (21%; 81/394) indicated working in an environment in which employees experienced some form of workplace abuse. See page 207

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

spatial distributions coincided with rainfall patterns for the state, with most cases identified in the spring and in the western part of the state. Common exposure risks included contact with water in the environment (14/65) and contact with wildlife (14

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

manipulation (acepromazine, buprenorphine, and medetomidine), decompressive cystocentesis, and a low-stress environment. Treatment was successful in 11 of the 15 cats. None of the cats had severe metabolic or physiologic derangements prior to the initiation of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

CIV are not detected until 7 to 8 days after exposure, this suggested that more dogs were exposed to CIV in the shelter than were exposed in the urban environment. See page 71 Prevalence of resistance to macrolide antimicrobials or rifampin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association