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A stratified random sample of 50 Ohio dairy herds, monitored for 1 year between March 1988 and May 1989, was used to estimate the component costs of clinical mastitis per cow-year overall and by organism, the component costs of an episode of clinical mastitis overall and by organism, and the incidence of clinical mastitis by organism. Each herd was visited monthly by a veterinarian who conducted on-farm interviews and completed standardized data-collection forms designed to elicit economic information about the on-farm costs of clinical mastitis and mastitis prevention. Producers collected milk samples prior to treatment of clinical mastitis cases. Culturing methods allowed identification of 18 specific mastitis pathogen classifications. Annual costs estimated were on a per cow-year and clinical episode basis. The monthly mean population of cows monitored was 4,068. Mastitis prevention cost $14.50/cow-year, whereas the cost incurred by producers because of clinical cases of mastitis was $37.91. Organisms prevalent in the cows’ environment caused the most costly types of mastitis. Disregarding contaminated samples and episodes for which no milk samples were taken, mastitis for which 2 organisms were isolated accounted for 35.5% of costs of clinical mastitis, followed by cases for which Escherichia coli (21.3%) was isolated, cases for which culturing yielded no growth (8.6%), and cases for which esculin-positive Streptococcus spp (6.4%), Klebsiella spp (5.7%), esculin-negative CAMP-negative Streptococcus spp (5.1%), Enterobacter spp (4.8%), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (4.1%), coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp (3.0%), S agalactiae (2.5%), and Bacillus spp (1.2%) were isolated. Other categories of classification each accounted for < 0.5% of costs. Mean cost per clinical episode was $107.11. Mean incidence of clinical mastitis was 38.74 cases/100 cowyears. Mixed infections had the highest incidence (mean, 4.80 cases/100 cow-years), followed by cases with no growth (2.96), E coli (2.10), esculin-positive Streptococcus spp (1.94), coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (1.60), esculin-negative CAMP-negative Streptococcus spp (1.25), coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp (1.04), Enterobacter spp (0.36), and Klebsiella spp (0.27).

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

factors that influence size and growth rates in rural mixed-animal practice is important for practitioners working in this environment. In a survey 12 of recruiters, more respondents in food or mixed-animal practices reported that it was difficult to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

an environment in which the cost of veterinary service increases at a rate disproportionate to the cost of service delivered by herd personnel, and the value of animals and difference in expected probability outcomes decrease, the range of services

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pathogens, and the 45-day period after weaning should better prepare calves for the stresses associated with transportation and adaptation to a new environment. It is difficult to compare the price premiums for the study reported here with other published

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to a new environment. Price differentials for calves in the V45 and V34 certified health programs escalated over time on an actual dollars-per-cwt basis and as a percentage of the base market price, with maximum values in 2008 and 2007, respectively

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association