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Summary

Twenty-four healthy cats underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage to determine the normal cytologic environment of the lower respiratory tract of cats. Initial screening to ensure the health of the study population included complete histories, physical examinations, thoracic radiography, cbc, serologic tests for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, and occult heartworm, and sugar and Baermann fecal flotation. In 18 cats, protected catheter brush samples of airway secretions from the lavaged lung segment were taken for culture of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and mycoplasma. Bronchial lavage fluid (5 sequential 10-ml aliquots of normal saline solution) was pooled and filtered with cotton gauze. The unspun sample was used for determination of a total nucleated cell count. Lavage fluid was cytocentrifuged and 500 cells/slide were scored for determination of the cellular differential. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase and concentrations of total protein and IgG within the supernatant were measured, and assays were performed to detect the presence of IgA and IgM. Complete histologic evaluation of the lavaged lung of each of 6 random-source cats was performed after differential cell counting revealed 18% eosinophils within bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from this group.

Alveolar macrophages were the predominant cells encountered; however, a quarter of all cells recovered were eosinophils. A significant relationship was not found between the abundance of eosinophils in the lavage fluid, and either isolation of aerobic bacteria, high total nucleated cell counts, total protein concentrations, or activity of lactate dehydrogenase. Histologic evaluation of the lungs of 5 of 6 random-source cats revealed normal lungs in 2 cats, and minimal abnormal change in 3 others. Evaluation of the lungs from 1 random source cat revealed acute, mild eosinophilic bronchiolitis. We conclude that large numbers of eosinophils may be retrieved from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of healthy cats.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

antigenic stimulation. The rabbits of the present study were specific pathogen–free rabbits and housed in a clean controlled environment. Although housing was not specified in the previous study, 8 we presume that sanitization and air filtering requirements

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, captive environments with (case study 1 controls) and without (case study 2 controls) TB, as well as from both wild-caught (case study 3) and captive (case studies 4 and 5) macaques in which spontaneous infection was found or suspected ( Supplementary

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

parts of North America and Australia. These ruminants are accustomed to difficult environments, such as rugged mountains and desert terrain. In Iran, camels primarily live in the eastern and northeastern desert regions. 10 In a 1971 study, 3 serum

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

with the anticoagulant, placed in a 37°C preheated tube, and transported to the laboratory where it was maintained at 37°C. All blood samples were collected from dogs in the early morning in a calm environment, and all dogs had platelet counts > 250

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

acclimatation to a new environment and were provided free choice hay and water throughout the study period, except for a 12-hour fast prior to performance of the OGAT. Physical examinations were performed every 12 hours over the 5-day study period. A jugular

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

environment, which is highly dependent on the plasticizer used. 36 Plasticizers are chemical components added to the hard plastic bag to improve its flexibility and durability. Each one has innate chemical and physical characteristics that modify gas exchange

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

to that of the ambient environment, and this may vary considerably. When a sample at room temperature is added to a thromboelastometry or thromboelastography cup at 37°C, it takes time for the sample to warm to this operating temperature, the time

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

present study had the limitations of in vitro models. Compensatory mechanisms like buffering, pH control, and electrolyte environment are not the same as in vivo. Also, the metabolic degradation of HES molecules by plasma α-amylase and the contribution of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

laboratory, whereas the CHROM kit would appear to be the simplest to use, with the least subjective result interpretation in a clinic environment. Because of very strong naturally occurring anti-A alloantibodies in the plasma of type B cats older than 3

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research