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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the dose of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) needed to achieve at least a 3-fold increase in plasma CoQ10 concentration in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and congestive heart failure (CHF).

ANIMALS

18 dogs with CHF due to MMVD and 12 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, dogs with MMVD were given 50 or 100 mg of water-soluble CoQ10 (ubiquinone; total daily dose, 100 mg [n = 5] or 200 mg [6]) or a placebo (7), PO, twice a day for 2 weeks in addition to regular cardiac treatment. Plasma CoQ10 concentration was measured in dogs with MMVD before (baseline) and at various time points after supplementation began and in healthy dogs once. Concentrations were compared among and within groups.

RESULTS

No significant difference in median baseline plasma CoQ10 concentration was detected between healthy dogs and dogs with MMVD. Fold increases in plasma CoQ10 concentrations ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and 3.2 to 6.8 for individual dogs in the 100-mg and 200-mg groups, respectively. The change in plasma CoQ10 concentration after supplementation began was significantly higher than in the placebo group at 4 hours and 1 and 2 weeks for dogs in the 200-mg group and at 1 and 2 weeks for dogs in the 100-mg group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A daily CoQ10 dose of 200 mg was sufficient to achieve at least a 3-fold increase in plasma CoQ10 concentration and may be used in CoQ10 supplementation studies involving dogs with CHF due to MMVD.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

quarantine facility in individual stalls that had shaved wood bedding, which was similar to their home environments. They were fed a concentrate feed twice each day and had ad libitum access to hay and water. During transportation to Narita International

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is the highest and biggest plateau in the world, with an area of 2.5 million km 2 and a mean altitude > 4,500 m. The flora and fauna on the plateau are constantly exposed to a harsh environment with a low percentage of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

administered in the home environment. Finally, different rates of metabolism could have contributed to the wide variation in circulating atenolol concentrations in cats that received the stable atenolol formulation. Subjectively assessed results of drug

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

uncomfortable environment in the transportation vehicle. 16 The occurrence of respiratory disease associated with transportation is sufficiently common that horsemen and veterinarians colloquially call it shipping fever. Immune depression associated with a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the cases and, therefore, could be expected to have been similarly exposed to factors in their natural environment such as diet, physiologic stressors, and infectious diseases. Another advantage of the free-ranging control group was the definitive

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

withheld from the dogs for a minimum of 6 hours and dogs were not exercised for a minimum of 4 hours. All dogs were within 10% of estimated ideal body weight. Experiments took place in a temperature-controlled environment (22° to 24°C). The dogs at the WCPN

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

instrumentation —Food was with-held for 12 hours with complete water restriction for 6 hours, and alpacas were acclimated for a minimum of 2 hours to the hospital environment prior to induction of anesthesia. A 14-gauge polyurethane catheter a was aseptically

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

normal environment. All tapes were obtained by use of an AECG analysis system with prospective user interaction. a Any tape that did not have ≥ 20 hours of readable data was excluded. The total number of VPCs were tabulated, and the complexity of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rabbits were housed in stainless steel cages in a controlled environment, at temperatures of 20° to 25°C with 12 hours of light and 12 hours of dark/day. A commercial pellet diet and water were supplied ad libitum. Feed was withheld for a maximum of 4

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research