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involving comparison of different fixation methods and assessment of the effects on the adjacent segments of the same specimen. In the present study, results suggested that the distraction-fusion technique can change the mechanical environment of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hoof hitting the ground. The hoof is a dynamic structure able to respond to changes in its environment, such as changes in loading. 4–9 Various factors influence its biomechanics, including but not limited to shape, 10–16 shoeing, 17–22 substrate, 23

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

occurs, variations in the response to the external environment by the coordinated musculoskeletal and nervous systems may contribute to these differences between the similar waveforms, suggesting the impossibility of perfect repetitions. 32 With

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

ligaments were thawed, they were blotted on paper towels to remove excess fluid. They then were placed in serrated jaw clamps in a materials testing machine c to elongate the ligaments to failure in a controlled environment at a room temperature of 20°C

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

that the torque provided by the flexor apparatus could have been reduced by up to 3.6% at walk, 3.4% at trot, and 4.3% at canter. To our knowledge, the percentage of torque reduction required to benefit the mechanical environment of a healing flexor

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

within 4 hours following collection. Segments assigned to the chilled segment group were placed in 200 mL of Hartmann solution b in a sealed bag d and stored at 4°C within a thermostatically controlled environment for 24 hours prior to testing

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

comorbidities similar to those of the amputee dogs, thus reflecting patient conditions in a clinical environment. Materials and Methods Animals —Thirty-one quadruped control dogs and 19 thoracic limb amputees (11 with amputation of the left thoracic limb

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cohort of client-owned quadruped dogs that had orthopedic, neurologic, or other related comorbidities similar to those of the amputee dogs, thus reflecting patient conditions in a clinical environment. We hypothesized that limb loading and joint motion

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hooves, composition (largely dead keratinized cells) and restricted blood flow of the hoof wall have primary importance. The highly keratinized tissue of the hoof wall may need more time and stronger stimuli to respond to changes in its environment

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

distal aspects of limbs in horses without inducing large alterations in motion. These hoof-mounted sensors can collect data for multiple strides and can be used outside a laboratory environment, making them desirable for clinical use. Inertial measurement

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research