Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 116 items for :

  • "emergency room" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Daily caseload at a veterinary emergency room is often difficult to predict. Results of a recent study 1 indicate that a full moon significantly increases the caseload at a veterinary emergency room. In that study, 1 there was an increase of 0

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A literature search failed to find any studies evaluating possible relationships of the lunar phase and case evaluations in veterinary medicine. Although scientific evidence is lacking, many veterinarians and emergency room staff members believe that

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Canine patients often present to the emergency room (ER) in critical condition, necessitating immediate interventions to stabilize the dog. In many instances, especially with nonambulatory large-breed or critically ill dogs, there

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to the emergency room (ER) when performed by 2 veterinarians with similar experience and using a standardized technique after training. We hypothesized that intraobserver and interobserver reliability would be high when training and standardized

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine dose dependency of tranexamic acid–induced emesis and the time course of the antifibrinolytic potency of tranexamic acid in dogs.

Animals—10 Beagles.

Procedures—In a dose-escalating experiment, ascending doses of tranexamic acid (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg, IV) were administered at 5-minute intervals until vomiting was observed. In a separate single-dose experiment, ascending doses of tranexamic acid (20, 30, 40, and 50 mg/kg, IV) were administered at 1-week intervals until vomiting was observed. Time to onset of vomiting and number of vomiting episodes were measured in both experiments. In a coagulation experiment, a single 50 mg/kg bolus of tranexamic acid was administered, and blood was obtained 1 hour before and 20 minutes, 3 hours, and 24 hours after administration. Antifibrinolytic potency of tranexamic acid was evaluated by use of a modified rotational thromboelastography method.

Results—Tranexamic acid induced vomiting in a dose-dependent manner. Vomiting frequency was < 2 episodes, and vomiting concluded < 250 seconds after administration. Antifibrinolytic potency of tranexamic acid was significantly higher at 20 minutes following administration, but not different by 24 hours, when compared with the potency measured before administration. No adverse effects were observed in any experiment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IV administration of tranexamic acid induced emesis in a dose-dependent manner. The antifibrinolytic potency of tranexamic acid decreased in a time-dependent manner and was resolved < 24 hours after administration. Further studies are warranted to investigate the emetic and other adverse effects of tranexamic acid in dogs of various breeds and ages.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-sized cows and horses, simulation models include small animal intubation and resuscitation models and a technical simulation room that simulates many types of operating room, emergency room, and anesthesia situations. Realistic, low-risk environments

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

successful return of spontaneous circulation, the prognosis for survival and discharge from the hospital was grave for all patients. See PAGE 50 Effect of National Football League games on small animal emergency room caseload Because the caseload

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A13-year-old 7.3-kg (16.06-lb) sexually intact male Dachshund was evaluated because of acute pulmonary edema that developed during the preceding night. The dog was admitted to the emergency room and treated with furosemide and supplemental oxygen

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with AUS in an emergency room setting. 16 Future studies should investigate whether an AUS performed by a radiologist (vs in an emergency room setting) provides additional data that would influence an owner's decision in regard to pursuing treatment or

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 4-month-old sexually intact male Golden Retriever was brought to the emergency room in fulminant respiratory distress. Earlier in the day, the dog had swallowed a fish hook, which it subsequently vomited. Because of the dog's extreme

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association