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dorsoventral view. Scalloping of the ventral lung margins is also present, and overlying pleural effusion obscures the caudal vena cava. Most likely differential diagnoses for the severe increase in size of the cardiac silhouette include pericardial effusion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abdominal ultrasonographic images of the cat. A—A large amount of peritoneal effusion can be observed (F). The bilateral uterine horns were distended and filled with echogenic fluids. B—The left pancreas between the stomach and spleen was irregularly

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

—then turn the page → Diagnostic Imaging Findings and Interpretations A large amount of pleural effusion, a small amount of peritoneal effusion, and a substantial amount of subcutaneous edema ( Figure 2 ) is evident in the fetus with the slow

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

include pericardial effusion, pleuropneumonia, and heart failure secondary to a congenital cardiac anomaly. Figure 2— Same radiographic views as in Figure 1 . Notice the marked elevation in the trachea (arrows) indicative of cardiomegaly and border

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

( Figure 2 ). These findings are consistent with a moderate to severe volume of retroperitoneal effusion. Mild loss of serosal margin detail is also present in the peritoneal cavity, suggesting mild peritoneal effusion; the urinary bladder is minimally

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

turn the page → Radiographic Findings and Interpretation Severe pleural effusion is evident; it obscures the cardiac silhouette completely on the lateral projection and partially on the ventrodorsal projection. Parts of the cardiac silhouette

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

kidney. Radiographic differential diagnoses include retroperitoneal effusion, steatitis, or infiltration. Possible causes are neoplasia (involving the kidney or the adrenal gland), inflammatory pathological process, and urinary tract rupture or hemorrhage

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 6-month-old Duroc gilt intended for show purposes and weighing 136 kg (299 lb) was referred for a 1-month history of progressive left hind limb lameness and tarsocrural joint effusion. Intra-articular administration of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

( Figure 2 ). In addition, mild bilateral pleural effusion was evident with rounding and retraction of the lung margins, several thin pleural fissure lines, and soft tissue opacity in the pleural space silhouetting with the cardiac silhouette. In the left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 10-year-old 5.3-kg (11.7-lb) neutered male Chihuahua was referred for evaluation of a mediastinal mass and pleural effusion identified on thoracic radiographs obtained by the referring veterinarian. Clinical signs included a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association