Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Special Report x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Objective

To determine the patterns of use and perceived efficacy of polysulfated glycosaminoglycan (PSGAG) for the treatment of degenerative joint disease in horses.

Design

Cross-sectional mail survey.

Sample Population

1,522 equine practitioners.

Procedure

Information was obtained on frequency and route of administration of PSGAG for the treatment of each of 4 forms of degenerative joint disease, the efficacy of PSGAG, and its efficacy compared with that of sodium hyaluronate. Data were analyzed by nonparametric and multivariate regression methods.

Results

Response rate was 40.5%. Of practitioners responding, 26% were classified as having a special interest in lameness and 74% as general practitioners. Use of PSGAG was reported by 90.5% of all practitioners, but lameness practitioners used PSGAG more frequently than general practitioners. Use of PSGAG also was significantly more common among practitioners involved predominately with racing Thoroughbreds, Standardbreds, or show horses. Use of PSGAG was reported to be moderately effective in the treatment of the 4 joint disease conditions. Practitioners treating Thoroughbred racehorses gave highest efficacy scores, and pleasure horse practitioners gave lowest efficacy scores. Use of PSGAG was considered more effective than sodium hyaluronate for the treatment of subacute degenerative joint disease and less effective for idiopathic joint effusion and acute synovitis.

Clinical Implications

Use of PSGAG is regarded as moderately effective overall and is considered most useful in the treatment of subacute degenerative joint disease. The efficacy of PSGAG for incipient and chronic forms of degenerative disease is considered comparable to that of sodium hyaluronate. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:1564–1568)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

approaching the concentration at which colloidal osmotic pressure may be sufficiently decreased to result in effusion. This concentration warrants further investigation if an underlying cause has not been determined and may warrant treatment if effusion or

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evaluation of the kidneys and retroperitoneal space is not possible. Notice that proper positioning of the same animal (B) allows detection of effusion in the retroperitoneal space that could not be identified in the radiograph with improper positioning. In a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

samples [eg, fine-needle aspirates, imprints, scrapings, and effusions] obtained weekly, percentage of samples evaluated in-house vs submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory, reasons for use of cytologic examinations in practice, and importance of

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association