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/dL, respectively). Repeat thoracic ultrasound and an echocardiogram showed worsening bilateral free fluid and pericardial effusion. Most concerning, the horse became increasingly uncomfortable and remained persistently tachycardic and hyperlactatmic despite

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

effusion with lung compression. No thoracic or abdominal masses were evident. Approximately 1.3 L of serosanguineous pleural fluid (that did not clot) was obtained via thoracocentesis; the fluid's total protein concentration was 1.8 g/dL, and the PCV was 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pulses. No arrhythmias or murmurs were auscultated, and the other physical examination findings were considered normal. Pleural effusion was detected during a thoracic ultrasonographic examination; 1.75 L of blood-tinged lactescent fluid was removed via

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

approximately 2 mL of thin, pink-yellow, cloudy pericardial effusion present. Figure 1— Photographs of the cranial portion of the peritoneum (A) and heart (B) of a 5-week-old piglet that was euthanized following a progressive decline in its clinical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Comments For the foal of the present report, initial differential diagnoses based on the gross appearance of the abdominal fluid sample and its total protein and cell concentrations included chylous effusion, gastric rupture with leakage of milk or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

abdominal and pericardial effusion, respectively, and an aspirate of the abdominal effusion had total solids concentration of 3.8 g/dL. The cat's blood pressure did not respond to repeated IV administrations of colloid and crystalloid fluids. On the basis of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

well as all 4 limbs. Thoracic radiography performed by the referring veterinarian revealed moderate pleural effusion and a diffuse bronchial pattern. A sample of the pleural fluid was collected by ultrasound-guided thoracocentesis. Results of fluid

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Morphologic Diagnosis and Case Summary Morphologic diagnosis and case summary: mediastinal lymphoma with hemorrhagic pleural effusion and pulmonary atelectasis in a cat. Comments The differential diagnoses for cranial mediastinal masses in cats

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pericardium. Primary tumors in any of these body cavities can metastasize to multiple locations. 3,4 These neoplasms are often accompanied by extensive serous effusions secondary to obstructed lymphatics or tumor exudation. This fluid accumulation promotes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 6-year-old 575-kg (1,265-lb) Hanoverian mare was presented for evaluation of left metacarpophalangeal effusion with associated lameness. Ten days earlier, the horse was evaluated by the referring veterinarian because of grade 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association