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pericardectomy via thoracotomy for treatment of pericardial effusion in dogs In dogs with idiopathic pericardial effusion, subtotal pericardectomy via thoracotomy has been associated with an excellent prognosis. An alternative procedure, thoracoscopic creation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sphericity index in the detection of pericardial effusion in dogs Cardiac silhouettes of dogs with pericardial effusion are larger and more rounded than those for dogs with other cardiac disorders, but according to results of a new study, objective

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographic findings for dogs with cardiac tamponade attributable to pericardial effusion The characteristic radiographic sign of pericardial effusion in dogs is reported to be an enlarged cardiac silhouette with a globoid shape, but in a study of 50 dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

likely underestimate true recurrence rates. See PAGE 1450 Echocardiographic and clinicopathologic characterization of pericardial effusion in dogs No studies have been conducted to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

transudative pleural effusion in a cat after removal of a hydronephrotic kidney A 3-year-old Bengal cat with bilateral pleural effusion and hydronephrosis of the right kidney was examined. Cytologic analysis of a pleural fluid sample revealed characteristics

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

CFU counts, and sensitivity was only 89% (33/37). See page 177 Characterization of and factors associated with causes of pleural effusion in cats Congestive heart failure and neoplasia were the most common underlying causes in a study of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

found to have severe pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. A diagnosis of chylopericardium in the absence of pleural effusion was made. Subtotal pericardectomy and thoracic duct ligation were recommended. At the time of surgery, the dog had both

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

decreases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations 1 day after surgery and at discharge, compared with values for cats that underwent ureterotomy. Six cats in the ureteral stent group developed abdominal effusion after surgery, and cats that developed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

vena cava, and the chylous effusion was presumed to be a result of high cranial vena cava pressure affecting flow of chyle through the thoracic duct. In both dogs, self-expanding endovascular stents were placed in the cranial vena cava under

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Focal intramural pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade associated with necrotic adipose tissue in a dog A 1-year-old German Shepherd Dog was examined because of an acute onset of lethargy, tachypnea, and inappetence, and transthoracic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association