Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 44 items for :

  • Bone, Joint, and Cartilage x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Synovial effusion is an augmentation of the volume of synovial fluid within a joint as a result of synovitis. Synovial effusion of the DIP joint is commonly seen in horses with osteoarthritis, 1 subchondral cysts, 2,3 and septic arthritis 4

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Horses with OCD of the IRT often have clinical signs of inflammation of the TCJ. 1–13 Many affected horses may have joint effusion, lameness, or both, whereas others have no clinical signs. Clinical observations provide a subjective assessment of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

on clinical signs and disease-associated variables, compared with effects of control treatments, in experimentally induced osteoarthritis by evaluation of clinical (joint lameness, range of motion, response to flexion, and synovial effusion

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Osteochondritis dissecans of the TCJ is common in young horses. Although this condition can result in clinical signs of joint inflammation 1 (eg, joint effusion and lameness), some affected horses do not develop clinical signs. Histologic

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

synovial effusion), radiographic, gross, macroscopic, histologic, immunologic, and biochemical outcome measures. Our hypothesis was that the outcome of horses treated with PPS would be more favorable than that of control horses. Materials and Methods

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of the carpal regions, lameness examination, assessment of the response to flexion of the carpal joints, and analysis of synovial effusion were performed to ensure that all variables were within reference limits. The authors have had considerable

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

contribute to clinical manifestation of lesions. Another poorly understood aspect of clinical expression of tarsocrural OCD is the pathophysiologic background of its most common signs (ie, prominent joint effusion with minimal disturbance of motion). 7

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, 3) synovial membrane properties that affect the clearance rate of the biomarker, and 4) the osmotic gradient between the synovial fluid and the serum. 3–5 The clinical result of many of these potential factors is joint effusion even prior to the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

osteoarthritis by evaluation of clinical (joint lameness, range of motion, response to flexion, and synovial effusion), radiographic, gross, biochemical, immunologic, and histologic outcome measures. Our hypotheses were that the concentration of IL-1Ra would be

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

palpation) of effusion in the TMJs or MCP joints. Evaluation of 4 standard radiographic projections of the MCP joints obtained for all horses revealed no signs of orthopedic disease. Horses were housed as a group in an outside pen with unlimited access to

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research