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History A 13-year-old 5.5-kg (12.1-lb) castrated male Miniature Schnauzer was evaluated for a 2-day history of inappetence and an instance of vomiting 1 day before examination. The owner reported that diabetes mellitus had been diagnosed in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 14-year-old 12.5-kg (27.5-lb) female mixed-breed dog with a recent diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism and diabetes mellitus was evaluated as part of a recheck examination and because of lack of appetite, which had worsened in the last

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, porcelain gallbladder) were made. Ultrasonographic features of the liver were nonspecific for a disease process. Treatment and Outcome Laboratory findings revealed that the dog had diabetes mellitus with ketoacidosis and pancreatitis and peritonitis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to evaluation. The patient had a history of 3 episodes of paraparesis, 1 episode of open-mouth breathing, and 1 episode of vocalization (suspected to be a sign of pain). It was recently determined that the cat had diabetes mellitus, which was being

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

condition occurs most commonly in dogs with diabetes mellitus or primary renal glucosuria (as may occur in Fanconi syndrome) and has been reported in nondiabetic patients. Glucose-fermenting bacteria ( E coli and the genera Aerobacter , Klebsiella

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

motility to prevent fertilization and embryo implantation. 2 Their proposed mechanism of action and effects on various hormones are associated with numerous adverse effects including behavioral changes, weight gain, glucocorticoid suppression, diabetes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

proliferation of nerve fibers and Schwann cells (ie, schwannosis) in the perivascular spaces of the spinal cord has been documented secondary to physical injury and diabetes mellitus. 3 Other hypotheses about the origin of these tumors suggest that they

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

osteomyelitis in humans, 3 there is a much higher predisposition for it in conjunction with osteomyelitis in the extra-axial skeleton versus the axial skeleton, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus or neoplasia. 4 Other causes of intraosseous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association