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SUMMARY

After IV administration of 0.5 mg of glucagon/cat, glucose tolerance and insulin secretory response were evaluated in 10 lean cats, 10 obese cats, and 30 cats with diabetes mellitus. Blood samples for glucose and insulin determinations were collected immediately before and at 5, 10, 15. 30, 45, and 60 minutes after IV administration of glucagon. Baseline serum insulin concentration and insulin secretory response were used to classify diabetes mellitus in the 30 cats as type I or type II.

Mean (± SEM) baseline and 30-minute serum glucose concentrations in obese cats were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, compared with values in lean cats, but were similar at all other blood sample collection times. Serum glucose concentration in diabetic cats was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than values in obese and lean cats at all blood sample collection times. Two statistically different insulin responses to IV administration of glucagon were seen in diabetic cats. Of the 30 diabetic cats, 23 had minimal insulin secretory response after glucagon administration (ie, serum insulin concentration was at or below sensitivity of the insulin assay). Seven diabetic cats had baseline serum insulin concentration similar to that of obese cats and significantly (P < 0.05) greater than that of lean cats and of the other 23 diabetic cats. In these 7 diabetic cats, serum insulin concentration increased after glucagon administration. Total insulin secretion was not significantly different between these 7 diabetic cats and the lean and obese cats, and was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than total insulin secretion in the other 23 diabetic cats. Results support existence of type-I and type-II diabetes mellitus in cats.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Obese cats are at higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Even severely obese cats have fasting blood glucose concentrations within the reference range, but they have evidence of glucose intolerance when challenged with glucose during an IV

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. In many disease states, hypertonicity results from an increased serum concentration of endogenous or exogenous effective osmoles. Diabetes mellitus is an important cause of hypertonicity, which results from hyperglycemia, in humans and domestic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Amino acid analyses were performed on unused portions of blood and urine obtained for routine diagnostic testing. Urine samples from 3 healthy control dogs (2 dogs with no abnormalities and 1 dog with well-controlled diabetes mellitus; all 3 dogs were

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

onset diabetes mellitus in a herd of llamas, in Proceedings . 40th Annu Meet Am Assoc Vet Lab Diagn 1997 ; 43 . 12 Khatim MS Gumaa KA Petersson B , et al. The structure and hormone content of the endocrine pancreas of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

.) 35 In people, increased serum HA concentrations are noted in various disease states including pneumonia, 36 hepatitis, 37 diabetes mellitus, 38 and end-stage kidney failure. 39 Some of these conditions increase production or decrease clearance of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

used to assess glucose tolerance or to diagnose diabetes mellitus. 8–10 To our knowledge, the IVGTT has never been performed in Japanese black bears, and few if any studies on pancreatic function have involved bears. To perform an IVGTT in bears

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cats Chronic kidney disease 28 (21.4) Age-related changes 25 (19.1) Multiple conditions 19 (14.5) Diabetes mellitus 8 (6.1) Malnourishment or muscle wasting 6 (4.6) Severe behavior problems 6 (4

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

RW , et al. Systemic hypertension and proteinuria in dogs with diabetes mellitus . J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998 ; 213 : 822 – 825 . 6. Cortadellas O del Palacio MJ Bayon A , et al. Systemic hypertension in dogs with leishmaniasis: prevalence

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

deoxycorticosterone, 7 feeding a diet high in saturated fat, 8 endocrine disease (eg, hyperadrenocorticism, diabetes mellitus, or hypothyroidism), granulomatous meningoencephalitis, and nasal tumors, 9 but few studies have been conducted to elucidate the mechanism

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research