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SUMMARY

Fructosamine, a glycated serum protein, was evaluated as an index of glycemic control in normal and diabetic cats. Fructosamine was determined manually by use of a modification of an automated method. The within-run precision was 2.4 to 3.2%, and the day-to-day precision was 2.7 to 3.1%. Fructosamine was found to be stable in serum samples stored for 1 week at 4 C and for 2 weeks at − 20 C. The reference range for serum fructosamine concentration in 31 clinically normal colony cats was 2.19 to 3.47 mmol/L (mean, 2.83 ± 0.32 mmol/L). In 27 samples from 16 cats with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, the range for fructosamine concentration was 3.04 to 8.83 mmol/L (mean, 5.93 ± 1.35 mmol/L). Fructosamine concentration was directly and highly correlated to blood glucose concentration. Fructosamine concentration also remained high in consort with increased blood glucose concentration in cats with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus over extended periods. It is concluded that measurement of serum fructosamine concentration can be a valuable adjunct to blood glucose monitoring to evaluate glycemic control in diabetic cats. The question of whether fructosamine can replace glucose for monitoring control of diabetes mellitus requires further study.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

liver disease or neoplasia. 2–4 In addition, PON1 has anti-inflammatory properties. 5 The activity of PON1 is reportedly low in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus 6 and obesity, 7,8 and low activity may contribute to the development of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

abnormal, can often develop postprandial hypertriglyceridemia. 3 Obesity and diabetes mellitus in dogs can also induce similar pre- and postprandial triglyceride changes as those in humans. 4 Point-of-care glucose testing is commonly performed in human

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

bruising or hematomas, especially after several consecutive venipuncture procedures. Third, previous studies 10–12 have revealed that capillary blood samples can be obtained by owners to monitor blood glucose concentrations in dogs with diabetes mellitus

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

pathogenesis of various diseases and treatments, including mucopolysaccharido-sis, rheumatoid arthritis, urolithiasis, neoplasia of the urinary tract, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, diabetes mellitus, interstitial cystitis, renal failure, glomeru

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

clinical and research purposes in equine medicine. Glucose-monitoring systems (GMSs) are widely used in people, primarily to monitor people with type 1 diabetes mellitus but also in the critical care setting because of agreement of their measurements with

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

addition, 2 dogs with acute pancreatitis had concurrent diabetes mellitus. Overall, 23 of 29 (79%) dogs in the acute pancreatitis group survived to hospital discharge, and all survivors were alive 1 month after discharge from the hospital. The median

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(including Chinese hamsters, 16 gerbils, 16 rats, 16 mice, 16 guinea pigs, 17,18 chinchillas, 18,19 and degus 18,20 ) can have primary health conditions that cause issues with glucose homeostasis, most commonly in the form of diabetes mellitus. Venous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

disease (2), renal disease (2), trauma or orthopedic injury (4), diabetes mellitus (1), hemangiosarcoma (1), heatstroke (1), and meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (1). All results were within the reportable range for all 3 analyzers. The results of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

provide results equivalent to laboratory-derived plasma concentrations is important and can impact clinical decisions. Adjusting treatments is important in critical care settings, particularly in dogs with sepsis, liver failure, and diabetes mellitus

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research