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Summary

Nine horses with (naturally acquired) congestive heart failure were treated with 2.2 μg of digoxin/kg of body weight by the Iv route, followed by 11 μg/kg administered orally every 12 hours thereafter. Furosemide was administered IV concurrently with IV administered digoxin every 12 hours. Serum concentration of digoxin was measured after the first (Iv) and seventh (orally administered) dose.

After Iv administration, digoxin disposition was described by a 2-compartment model, with a rapid distribution phase (t1/2α = 0.17 hour), followed by a slower elimination phase (β = 0.096 ± 0.055 h−1, t1/2β = 7.2 hours, where β is the exponential term from the elimination phase of the concentration vs time curve). Bioavailability after oral administration was 21.2 ± 10.8%. After the seventh orally administered dose, serum concentration of digoxin peaked 1 to 2 hours later, and was 1.9 ± 0.7 ng/ml (mean ± sd). In 4 horses, a second increase in serum digoxin concentration was observed 4 to 8 hours after the initial peak, which possibly was evidence of enterohepatic recycling of the drug.

Response to treatment included reduction in heart rate, peripheral edema, and pulmonary edema, but these could not be attributed to the digoxin alone because the horses were treated concurrently with furosemide.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The function of atrial natriuretic peptide (anp) is claimed to be control of salt and water homeostasis, and thus, the hormone may be involved in the pathogenesis of certain diseases with impaired volume regulation. We, therefore, studied plasma anp concentration in dogs with chronic renal failure, congestive heart failure, and hyperadrenocorticism. Dogs with chronic renal failure had twofold higher plasma anp concentration (16.2 ± 5.8 fmol/ml), compared with healthy dogs (8.3 ± 3.5 fmol/ml). An even more distinct increase (sixfold) of plasma anp concentration was found in dogs with congestive heart failure (52.9 ± 29.7 fmol/ml). In contrast, dogs with hyperadrenocorticism did not have high anp plasma concentration (5.5 ± 2.0 fmol/ml). High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of plasma from dogs with congestive heart failure indicated that, in addition to the normal circulating form of anp (99-126), the unprocessed precursor anp (1-126) is detectable in the circulation. These qualitative and quantitative alterations of plasma anp concentration in dogs further suggest involvement of this peptide in the development and/or maintenance of diseases associated with impaired volume regulation.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Heart disease in reptiles remains infrequently reported in the veterinary literature, as do successful treatments. 1–6 Congestive heart failure has been diagnosed in snakes, chelonians, and lizards. 7–10 , a Related clinical findings are

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cardiovascular disease included cardiomyopathy followed by myocarditis and arteriosclerosis. Of those rabbits, 33.9% were diagnosed with congestive heart failure, indicating it may happen more common than previously thought. 13 There are studies evaluating

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

; 25 : 427 – 431 . 10.1097/FPC.0000000000000152 28. Ware WA Lund DD Subieta AR , et al. Sympathetic activation in dogs with congestive heart failure caused by chronic mitral valve disease and dilated cardiomyopathy . J Am Vet Med Assoc 1990

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research