Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for :

  • "colostrum" x
  • Pathology in Practice x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

History A Holstein heifer calf was born during an uneventful parturition in the evening and received 4 quarts of maternal colostrum within 2 hours after birth. The following morning, the calf was bloated and repeated attempts by both the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History An 8-hour-old 50.5-kg (111-lb) female American Quarter Horse foal was evaluated by its primary veterinarian because of colic of 7 hours' duration. Initially, the foal was reluctant to nurse and was tube fed colostrum. Shortly

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A female mixed-breed foal ( Equus caballus ) was rejected by the dam at birth. It did not receive colostrum or suckle at any time. The owner then provided cow's milk (5 L/d) in a bottle as a substitute, which the foal consumed. At 3

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

observed urination occurred 24 hours prior to evaluation. The cria had a history of poor growth, with 7.2% weight loss in the preceding 2 days. This animal was part of a herd containing > 75 alpacas; as part of neonatal management, colostrum of adequate

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

be further distributed into various subtypes or strains. 2 , 3 Though some subtypes are host-specific to either goats or sheep, several subtypes are capable of cross-species infection. 2 , 3 Lentivirus predominantly spreads through colostrum or milk

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

month premature, was unable to stand or suckle, and had been breathing rapidly with increased effort. The owners had administered 7 ounces of a commercial colostrum replacer by mouth 1 hour before bringing the calf to the hospital. Clinical and

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Maternally derived colostrum antibodies seem to protect neonatal calves from Babesia spp and Anaplasma sp. 6 However, because ruminants do not transfer antibodies through the placenta, it is difficult to understand why Anaplasma and Babesia

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

neonates (1 to 9 days of age) that likely had nursed and fetuses that had not nursed because consumption of colostrum can markedly affect vitamin A concentration. 7 The liver tissue vitamin A concentration for the calf of the present report was less than

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, calves with M bovis infection usually die or are euthanized. 3 Elimination of the disease from a herd often involves culling of infected animals, such as cows with Mycoplasma mastitis. It is important to avoid feeding milk and colostrum from such

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intermediate hosts, including mice and rats, that make the oocysts available for the definitive hosts as well. 4 Other factors are presence of oocyst- contaminated grass, food containers, and drinking water; colostrum contaminated with tachyzoites; calving

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association