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Objective

Evaluation of a portable clinical analyzer for determination of blood gas tensions, electrolyte and glucose concentrations, and Hct in a hospital setting.

Design

Prospective study.

Animals

50 dogs, 50 cats, and 28 horses, all clinically normal.

Procedure

Blood samples were analyzed on a portable clinical analyzer to determine concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, BUN, glucose, and ionized calcium and values of Hct, pH, Pco2, and Po2. Values obtained were compared with those obtained from the same blood samples, using a standard automatic analyzer (serum sodium, potassium, chloride, BUN, and glucose concentrations), a cell counter (Hct), a blood gas analyzer (pH, Pco2, Po2), and a calcium-pH analyzer (ionized calcium). Bias (mean difference between values obtained on the same sample by different methods) and variability (SD of differences) were determined for all values. Data were also subjected to Deming regression analysis.

Results

Correlation coefficients were > 0.90 for all values except potassium and ionized calcium concentrations. Bias and variability were within clinically acceptable limits (± 2 SD) for all but potassium, ionized calcium, and glucose concentrations and Hct. Species-dependent variability was observed for glucose concentration and Hct.

Clinical Implications

Most differences between values obtained with the portable clinical analyzer and standard clinical laboratory systems could be accounted for by differences in type of sample tested (blood vs serum). The portable clinical analyzer is suitable for point-of-care analysis in critical care situations and for routine blood biochemical analysis when extensive laboratory support is unavailable. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:691-694)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To compare, for blood samples from dogs and horses, blood electrolyte concentrations, blood gas partial pressures, and Hct obtained using a handheld analyzer with those obtained using a standard chemistry analyzer and to compare results obtained with the handheld analyzer using warm versus cold test cartridges.

Design

Case series with analysis of split samples.

Sample Population

Blood samples from 22 dogs and 17 horses.

Procedure

Sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, bicarbonate, and total CO2 concentrations, pH, Po2, Pco2, base excess, and Hct were determined by use of a handheld analyzer and test cartridges that had been allowed to warm to ambient temperature or had been recently removed from a refrigerator. Results were compared with those from a standard chemistry analyzer by use of linear regression.

Results

For canine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r 2 ≥ 0.83) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for sodium concentration (r 2 = 0.6). For equine samples, values obtained with the handheld analyzer and warm cartridges were highly correlated (r 2 ≥ 0.79) with values obtained with the standard chemistry analyzer, except for Hct (r 2 = 0.38). For all samples, results obtained with cold and warm cartridges were moderately correlated (r 2 ≥ 0.69).

Clinical Implications

Results obtained with the handheld analyzer were similar to those obtained from the standard chemistry analyzer, with the exception of sodium concentration for canine samples and Hct for equine samples. Results were not substantially affected by use of cold, rather than warm, test cartridges. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:526-530)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cardiovascular effects in dogs. More recent testing involving human atrial myocytes and canine Purkinje fiber cells demonstrated that tilmicosin has substantial calcium channel antagonist activity. a A study b involving dogs given tilmicosin IV followed by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

chews that are advertised by compounding pharmacies and available for veterinary practitioners to prescribe. Doxycycline might not be the best candidate for drug compounding because of its interactions with multivalent cations (eg, calcium, iron

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association