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SUMMARY

We compared the anesthetic combination of detomidine, ketamine, and halothane in control horses not undergoing apparently painful procedures with that in horses during arthroscopic surgery. The effectiveness of this regimen in suppressing neurologic response to surgery was, thus, evaluated. In this study, significant differences were not observed in electroencephalographic total amplitude, spectral edge, or beta-to-delta frequency ratio between surgically treated and nonsurgically treated (control) horses. On the basis of its attenuation of encephalographic responses, we conclude that detomidine (20 μg/kg of body weight, iv) and ketamine (2.2 mg/kg, iv) induction of anesthesia followed by maintenance with halothane is an effective regimen for control of pain in horses during arthroscopic surgery.

The insignificant frequency changes observed without any other signs of inadequate anesthesia or pain may indicate a surgical stress response. We hypothesize that brain activity monitoring may give an earlier index to initiation of surgically induced stress than do hormonal responses, because endocrine alterations are not as rapidly perceived as is the electroencephalogram. Analysis of spectral edge frequency changes could be used to evaluate anesthetic regimens to find those that cause the least stress to the cns during surgery in horses. Differences in species responses to an anesthetic agent or the regimen’s effectiveness in prevention of pain during surgery may be identified by adoption of the study model. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary variables during anesthesia, with and without surgery, did not reveal any alterations that would be relevant to cns responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, Pa O 2 , Pa CO 2 , and pH were stabilized by use of intermittent positive-pressure ventilation in all horses, and dobutamine was administered, as needed, to avoid bias of electroencephalogram data.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, and management influences; development and validation of sick-animal detection algorithms based on activity counts; and comparison of outcomes for traditional health detection systems versus systems based on remote activity monitoring. Although results

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Assoc 2005 ; 226 : 913 – 919 . 10.2460/javma.2005.226.913 14. Lascelles BD Hansen BD Roe S , et al . Evaluation of clientspecific outcome measures and activity monitoring to measure pain relief in cats with osteoarthritis . J Vet Intern

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research