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was allowed outside, blocking exposure to outdoor cats, and using motion-activated sprinklers to deter outdoor cats. The owner was instructed to keep cat A and cat B separated when not closely supervised and avoid known aggressive triggers when they

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of dogs are signs of autonomic and neuroendocrine activation associated with fear. 2,3 Tucking of the tail also indicates fear in dogs. 6 Salivation can be caused by oropharyngeal problems, nausea secondary to gastrointestinal tract or metabolic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

conditioned (building independence). 1–5,7,10 A remotely activated treat dispenser was recommended to facilitate this process. Because the anxious behavior was increasing in frequency and intensity, psychotropic medications were prescribed. Buspirone, a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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8 months old; at that time, the owner stopped coming home for lunch. The dog began to bark in its crate when it was alone; a bark-activated shock collar had been used. At that time, the patient also began to tear up the bed in its crate when it was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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stress from household changes and threats from cat 2 likely resulted in a recurrent cycle of pain associated with urine marking and toileting 7 for cat 1. Recurrent pain has been shown to perpetuate sympathetic activation in cats with FIC 17–19 , g and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association