Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Summary

Antisera raised in rabbits against either purified recombinant-derived human tumor necrosis factor (tnf)- α (hutnf) or hutnf peptide-bovine thyroglobulin conjugates were evaluated for anti-equine tnf (eqtnf) activity. Binding and neutralizing anti-eqtnf activities were found in antisera raised against whole hutnf or against either of the peptides containing the N-terminal 15 amino acids of hutnf (hutnf[1-15] and hutnf[1-31]). Anti-eqtnf activity was not detected in antisera raised against hutnf[65-79], hutnf[98-111] or hutnf[124-141] peptides. The addition of excess hutnf[1-15] completely inhibited the ability of anti-hutnf[1-15] to bind eqtnf and reduced by approximately 25% the anti-eqtnf activity of an antiserum raised against whole hutnf. Nonconjugated hutnf[1-15] did not have eqtnf agonist or antagonist activity. Results were consistent with previous structural and functional data implicating the N-terminus of hutnf in receptor binding and indicate that the homologue of hutnf[1-15] on eqtnf may be a potentially important target for neutralizing anti-eqtnf antibodies.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mammary gland tissue produce immunomodulating factors (eg, TNF-α and ILs) that enhance recruitment of phagocytes from the blood into milk, where they can combat and eliminate invading pathogens. Therefore, the measurement of SCC in milk is used as an

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-phase proteins in horses. 1 Although many cytokines contribute to the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock, TNF-α is one of the principle mediators of the effects of LPS. It orchestrates a number of inflammatory responses and initiates formation of other molecules

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the ability of hyaluronic acid (HA), with and without transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), to stabilize the catabolic processes associated with atrophy of articular cartilage.

Animals

20 adult, skeletally normal, hound-type dogs.

Procedure

Dogs (20 to 30 kg) were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups. One group served as untreated controls. Bivalve casts were placed on the left hind limbs of the remaining 16 dogs to limit weightbearing and motion of the limb for 92 days. One group served as the cast control. Beginning on day 56, 3 groups received aseptic intra-articular injections in the left stifles of either 5 mg of HA or 5 mg of HA containing either 20 or 50 μg of TGF-β. Intra-articular injections were repeated at 4-day intervals until the end of the study. On day 92, stifles were harvested at necropsy. Medial femoral condyles were histologically processed, and the articular cartilage was stained for the presence of proteoglycans, stromelysin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, and TNF receptors (p55 and p75).

Results

Decreased metachromasia was evident in the cartilage matrix of all cast groups, with the smallest decrease in the HA-treated group. Stromelysin was immunolocalized in articular cartilage of the cast (left) limbs of cast control and both HA/TGF-β-treated groups. TNF-α was localized in articular cartilage of all cast (left) and right limbs, except those of the HA-treated group. Receptors for TNF were observed in both limbs of untreated control and cast control groups and cast limbs of HA/TGF-β-treated groups. The receptors were not localized in the right limbs of the HA with or without TGF-β-treated groups. TGF-β did not decrease stromelysin or TNF-α or receptors at the doses used.

Conclusions

HA may mediate a chondrostabilizing influence on articular cartilage by down-regulating TNF-α. Importantly, HA appeared to exert its inhibitory influence on TNF-α, as well as stromelysin and TNF receptors, on a systemic basis.

Clinical Relevance

Results provide insight into the mode of action of HA as a therapeutic agent for arthritis and its stabilizing influence on cartilage metabolism. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1488-1496)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 after HBOT, 10,11 and HBOT prevented fever in LPS-treated rabbits by reducing circulating TNF-α and hypothalamic prostaglandin E 2 . 12 In addition, rats repeatedly exposed to HBOT after they were

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

administration and 2 and 24 hours after the end of administration. The concentration of TNF-α was measured in serum samples for all blood sample collection times by use of a commercially available kit t to configure an ELISA. The kit contained capture and

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

potassium EDTA. All blood samples were centrifuged at 1,500 × g for 10 minutes. A 2-mL aliquot of serum or plasma was separated from each sample, placed in a cryovial, and frozen at −80°C until analyzed for serum cortisol and TNF-α concentrations or plasma

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

TNF-α concentrations have been associated with downregulation of adiponectin production in cocultured adipocytes and macrophages. 36 It has been suggested that in contrast to saturated FAs, n-3 PUFAs are unable to activate macrophages and may

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

:10, as suggested by the manufacturer, to ensure that concentrations were within the linear portion of the standard curve (5-60 μg/mL). Cytokine analysis— A canine cytokine kite that consisted of beads coated with antibodies against IL-6 and TNF-α was

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

concentrations of TNF-α have also been reported in obese dogs. 12,47 Tumor necrosis factor-α decreases adiponectin mRNA expression and secretion in cultured human 48 and canine 49 adipose tissue. It has been suggested that n-3 PUFAs, in contrast to saturated

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research