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concentration of IgG was 804 mg/dL. With the assay used, the ideal serum IgG concentration for a foal > 18 hours old but < 2 weeks old is > 725 mg/dL; an adequate value for healthy foals of this age range is > 440 mg/dL. Morphologic Diagnosis and Case

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

passing only a small amount of meconium prior to the examination, the foal passed a large amount of meconium following administration of a commercial sodium phosphate enema. a The foal's serum IgG concentration was determined to be 400 to 800 mg/dL by an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sections. a After 30 minutes, the slide was washed 3 times with PBS solution, and then incubated with a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated rabbit anti-dog IgG antibody. b The section was washed again and counterstained with Evans blue stain. c The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

thereafter, the foal began to roll on the ground and appeared to be in pain. The veterinarian subsequently used a point-of-care semiquantitative enzyme immunoassay a to measure serum IgG concentration, which was 800 mg/dL. A single dose of butorphanol

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

page→ Clinicopathologic and Histopathologic Findings The cytologic findings were suggestive of a protozoal infection; however, some consideration was given to fungal disease. No serum anti- Toxoplasma IgG and IgM were detected with specific

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cases of acquired junctional epidermolysis bullosa, no breed or age predilection was evident; none of the affected dogs were Great Danes, and all dogs had IgG autoantibodies against laminin 332. Dogs with EBA are more likely to have paw pad involvement

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

contained osmophilic globules. Additionally, acicular clefts were present within a capillary lumen. Direct immunofluorescence staining of renal biopsy cores was performed with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibodies against canine IgG, a IgM, a IgA

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

erosion and ulceration. Pemphigus vulgaris is caused by binding of circulating autoantibodies (typically IgG4) against desmoglein-3. 3 Patients with lesions on haired skin may also have detectable antibodies against desmoglein-1. 4 Paraneoplastic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

rickettsii –specific IgM concentration or a 4-fold increase in R rickettsii –specific IgG concentration. 17 The case reported here was clinically confounded, given that the dog had clinical signs consistent with RMSF and was seropositive for R rickettsii

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Plasmacytomas react positively with stains specific for IgG, IgA, IgM, CD45, CD18, or CD79α. 12,13 Amyloid deposits have been identified in digital and mucocutaneous plasmacytomas of dogs and are of immunoglobulin amyloid type (primary amyloidosis) rather than

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association