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Summary

Twelve dairy herds that had participated in the Pennsylvania Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA) program for at least 12 months, that had a 12-month mean DHIA somatic cell count > 700,000 cells/ml, and that had > 25% of lactating cows infected with Streptococcus agalactiae participated in a herd blitz treatment program. Initially, quarter milk samples for bacteriologic culturing were collected from all lactating cows. Subsequently, all cows identified as infected with Str agalactiae were treated, using a commercial penicillin-novobiocin intramammary infusion product. In addition, a herd mastitis management program of postmilking teat dipping and treatment of all cows at the start of the nonlactating period was instituted. Thirty days after the initial herd visit, samples from all lactating cows were again cultured, and cows infected at that time were treated. Twelve months after the initial herd visit, samples from all lactating cows were again cultured.

Mean prevalence of infection with Str agalactiae decreased (P < 0.05) from 23.0% of quarters and 41.6% of cows initially to 3.4% of quarters and 9.3% of cows at 30 days and 1.6% of quarters and 4.2% of cows at 1 year. Mean herd DHIA somatic cell count decreased (P < 0.05) from 918,000 cells/ml initially to 439,000 cells/ml at 30 days and 268,000 cells/ml at 1 year. The mean net increase in 365-day DHIA rolling herd production for the first year after treatment was 512 kg of milk and 14 kg of butterfat.

Benefit-to-cost ratios were estimated for 3 methods of identifying cows for treatment in a blitz treatment program. Analysis revealed similar economic gains for culturing of all lactating cows followed by treatment of those infected with Str agalactiae (benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.28:1), and for treatment of all lactating cows with a DHIA linear somatic cell count score ≥ 4, regardless of infection status (benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.18:1).

Treatment of all lactating cows, regardless of somatic cell count or infection status, was least cost-effective (benefit-to-cost ratio, 1.26:1). It is suggested that blitz treatment, used with postmilking teat dipping and treatment of all cows at the start of the nonlactating period, is an economically justifiable program for herds with high prevalence of Str agalactiae mastitis, and owing to labor considerations, the use of DHIA linear somatic cell counts may be the best method to identify cows for treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mean plasma fibrinogen concentration, regardless of the route. The pharmacokinetic study 3 involved evaluation of procaine penicillin G (21,000 U/kg [9,545 U/lb]) administered into the abdominal cavity of 8 healthy lactating dairy cows after incision

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

days (95% confidence interval, 126 to 212 days). Duration of time off chemotherapy was associated with likelihood of response to retreatment. See page 501 Inadvertent IV penicillin G procaine–penicillin G benzathine administration in two dogs

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

vaccine in 1937 2,3 and the introduction of penicillin for treatment of infected animals provided the means to control anthrax among livestock and to reduce spread of the disease to humans. Nevertheless, anthrax epizootics still occur every year

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

uneventfully. Prior to the surgery, the ceftiofur sodium had been replaced by procaine penicillin G (22,000 U/kg [10,000 U/lb], SC, q 12 h for 10 days). Flunixin meglumine (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], IV, q 24 h) was given for 4 days after surgery. Three days after

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was placed in the left jugular vein, and potassium G penicillin (22,000 U/kg [10,000 U/lb], IV, q 6 h) and ceftiofur (2.2 mg/kg [1 mg/lb], IV, q 24 h) were administered. The cow continued to bloat intermittently during the next 48 hours, had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

accordance with the clinical signs, horses were administered a penicillin-streptomycin combination j approved for use in horses in Japan (penicillin [8,000 U/kg] and streptomycin [10 mg/kg], IM, q 24 h) or cephalothin sodium k (20 mg/kg, IV, q 6 h) as

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

clinical trial, 44 sheep and goats with caseous lymphadenitis were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (opening, draining, and flushing lesions and SC administration of penicillin [n = 15]; closed-system lavage and intralesional administration of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

increased the price of beef calves, with price premiums increasing over time. FARAD Digest Extralabel use of penicillin in food animals 1401 Penicillin is one of the most commonly detected drug residues in tissues and milk, and is the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Drug Year 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 S intermedius (n = 219) (283) (273) (264) (278) Penicillin 24 26 17 22 19 Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid 99 98 98 97 84 Oxacillin 98 * 98

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association