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Differential diagnoses for polyostotic, aggressive bone lesions include infectious and neoplastic etiologies. 1 Bacterial, fungal, or protozoan organisms may cause osteomyelitis. The most common systemic fungal diseases are blastomycosis, histoplasmosis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

provided comparable information on the presence of pituitary adenomas in dogs with PDH. See PAGE 409 Plasma fibrinogen concentration as an indicator of physeal or epiphyseal osteomyelitis in foals Physeal and epiphyseal osteomyelitis are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

significant effects on any other measured variables. See page 1064 Zoo Animals Treatment of mandibular osteomyelitis in two red-necked wallabies Two female red-necked wallabies ( Macropus rufogriseus ) were evaluated because of a sudden

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

bone lesion is not apparent. Metastatic neoplasia and osteomyelitis are also considered as differential diagnoses for the aggressive bone lysis but considered less likely. Figure 2— Same radiographic image as in Figure 1 . There is a complete

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Morphologic Diagnosis and Case Summary Morphologic diagnosis: marked pyogranulomatous osteomyelitis with intra- and extracellular yeasts morphologically compatible with Cryptococcus sp. Case summary: cryptococcal osteomyelitis in a dog. Comments

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

very similar case involving a juvenile peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus ) was reported, but owing to the bird's age and the presence of kyphosis, the diagnosis made was vertebral osteomyelitis, which is more commonly reported as affecting poultry. 4

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-abdominal abscesses. 2–4 Nonseptic polysynovitis characterized by synovial effusion without lameness has been identified for a multitude of foals with R equi pneumonia. 5–7 Septic arthritis and osteomyelitis also have been reported, both with and without

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

equi is also known to cause a number of extrapulmonary diseases in foals, including ulcerative enterocolitis and typhlitis, abdominal lymphadenitis, polysynovitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, diskospondylitis, and inflammation of the ocular structures (eg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

unremarkable. Differential diagnoses for the sternal changes included previous trauma, multiple myeloma, malignant neoplasia, and fungal or bacterial osteomyelitis. Figure 1— Lateral radiographic view of the thorax of a 5-year-old dog that was evaluated

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

well as osteomyelitis (fungal or bacterial) and intraosseous epidermoid cyst. Lesions that are primarily osteolytic are more commonly associated with neoplasia. 1 It is difficult to differentiate neoplasia from osteomyelitis radiographically; however

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association