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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Nine dogs with intermediate- or high-grade lymphoma were prospectively entered into a protocol to be given a total of 15 weekly doses of doxorubicin (10 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) in an attempt to eliminate all clinical evidence of neoplasia, with minimal risk of drug toxicity. Eight of these dogs did not complete the protocol because of progression of the disease. The median number of doses administered to dogs that developed progressive disease before the regimen was completed was 5 (range, 2 to 9). Seven dogs achieved partial (n = 5) or complete (n = 2) remission, with median duration of 14 days (range, 7 to 231 days). The dog that was given all 15 weekly treatments remained in complete remission for 231 days. Complete remission that lasted for 14 days was observed in another dog. Toxicosis developed in 3 dogs; signs of toxicosis were generally mild and included colitis (n = 1), vomiting (n = 1), neutropenia (n = 1), and lethargy (n = 1). The lowest neutrophil count (1,876 cells/μl) was seen in one dog after 7 doses of doxorubicin were given. Doxorubicin at dosage of 10 mg/m2/wk appears to be safe, but is generally ineffective for treatment of lymphoma.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Studies of the immunodetection of various microorganisms by various assay systems indicated that the most specific and sensitive assays are immunofluorescence, radioimmunoassay, and immunoblot analysis (western blot), followed by sensitive but less specific elisa and agglutination assays and, finally, by even less sensitive but very specific virus isolation and double immunodiffusion techniques. The first test for the clinical detection of FeLV infection in pet cats was the immunofluorescent antibody (ifa) test, which was introduced in 1972. The FeLV test is used for detection for FeLV infection and not as a test for leukemia or any other feline disease. The ifa test was compared with an immunodiffusion (id) test and with tissue culture isolation (tci) of the virus in 26 cats to establish a standard for FeLV tests. Excellent correlation was observed between the ifa and the id tests (100%) and between the ifa and id tests, compared with tci (96.2%). From these studies, it is clear that the ifa test is more accurate and more practical, and that results can be obtained faster than can those for the id or tci tests for FeLV.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group, the scoring system approximated this same system, with the exception that it did not contain a score of 5, designated in the Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group system as the score for death as an adverse

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. Episodes of neutropenia were reported in 2 out of 14 (14%) dogs. Two further dogs experienced gastrointestinal adverse effects, one of which was Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group–Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (VCOG-CTCAE v2) 12 grade I

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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comparative veterinary research and will assist in relevant target antigen identification and patterns of expression. 51 , 52 Canine CAR-T cells currently being explored in immuno-oncology are restricted to targets for which cross-reactive scFvs have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

development or recurrence, compared with those who are administered other immunosuppressive agents such as cyclosporine. 4 In human oncology, rapamycin and its derivatives are being used as antineoplastic agents with increasing frequency and have been

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine characteristics of cats and their owners with regard to outdoor access of owned cats.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—184 owned cats admitted to a veterinary referral center for nonemergency health concerns.

Results—Cats acquired recently were less likely to be allowed outdoors than those acquired during previous years. Outdoor access was often limited during the day; few owners allowed their cats to remain outdoors at night. Cats acquired from shelters were more likely to be kept exclusively as indoor pets than those cats acquired as strays. The presence of dogs but not other cats in the household was associated with increased outdoor access. Age, health status, and onychectomy status were not significantly associated with outdoor access. Cats allowed outdoor access were more likely to have been bitten by other cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The basis for an owner's decision to allow outdoor access appears to be multifactorial, and there may be regional differences in outdoor access of owned cats. Acquisition source is associated with outdoor access of owned cats. Availability of information regarding outdoor access of cats may influence decision making. Educational efforts targeted at specific groups of cat owners, as well as programs that acknowledge owner beliefs regarding quality of life for their cats, may help to address the health, safety, and population concerns associated with outdoor access of owned cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:15417–1545)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify radiographic abnormalities associated with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) and determine whether specific radiographic abnormalities could be used to identify dogs at risk of developing DLSS.

Design}Cohort study.

Animals—33 GSDs working as police dogs.

Procedures—Results of physical, neurologic, and orthopedic examinations were used to identify dogs with DLSS. Survey radiography of the lumbosacral junction was performed, and radiographs were compared with radiographs obtained 3 years earlier.

Results—DLSS was diagnosed in 15 of the 33 (45%) dogs. Thirteen of the 15 dogs with DLSS and 14 of the 18 dogs without DLSS had radiographic abnormalities of the lumbosacral junction. Twenty-two (67%) dogs were able to perform unrestricted duties, including 3 dogs with suspected DLSS. Six (18%) dogs had been excluded from active duty during the period of surveillance because of DLSS. Significant progression in specific clinical and radiographic signs was detected, but multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify any radiographic signs that could be used to predict the development of DLSS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that survey radiography cannot be used to predict development of DLSS in working GSDs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association