Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 3,430 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a debilitating condition, associated with high morbidity and mortality in both veterinary and human patients. 1 , 2 Metabolic disturbances, fluid imbalance, electrolyte abnormalities, hypertension

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Sudden renal parenchymal damage due to a variety of etiologies (eg, ureteral obstruction, pyelonephritis, renal ischemia, toxicosis) is an important clinical condition in cats resulting in acute kidney injury (AKI). Considering

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction In cats, upper motor neuron injury (UMNI) between the pons and L3 induces a deficit of the voluntary contraction of the detrusor muscle of the bladder due to the interruption of the propagation of the afferent signals from the

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

information for referring veterinarians and specialists when counseling an owner on whether IHD is an appropriate choice for the patient. ABBREVIATIONS AKI Acute kidney injury CI Confidence interval CKD Chronic kidney disease IHD Intermittent

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

1). On days 1 to 4 after sustaining the burn injuries, the dog was medically managed by a primary care veterinarian. Due to the severity of injuries noted, the dog was referred for ongoing medical and surgical management on day 5 and was hospitalized

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To characterize and contrast data from Thoroughbreds that incurred a fatal musculoskeletal injury ( fmi; injury resulting in death or euthanasia) during racing or training and data from all California race entrants during a 9-month period in 1991.

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

Thoroughbreds that incurred a fmi during racing or training at a California race-meet and all California race entrants from January through June and October through December 1991.

Procedure

Age and sex were compared with χ2 and Fisher's exact tests among horses fatally injured while racing and training. A log-linear model was fit to assess the relationship between race-meet and age and sex of California race entrants. Incidence risk of racing fmi was estimated per 1,000 race entrants, and the relationship between the occurrence of fmi during racing with race-meet, age, and sex was evaluated by logistic regression.

Results

Injury type and sex-specific age distributions differed among the horses fatally injured during racing and training. Age and sex distributions of the race entrants were not independent and varied among race-meets. Overall incidence risk of racing fmi was estimated at 1.7/1,000 race entrants. Risk of racing fmi in male horses was about twofold that in female horses, and in 4-year-olds was twofold that in 3-year-olds.

Clinical Implications

Age- and sex-related differences in risk of incurring a fmi during racing should be considered when comparing fatal injury rates among race-meets.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

. In addition, dogs can be exposed to a range of climatic conditions, often without any opportunity for an acclimatization period. Documentation of the illnesses and injuries experienced by US&R and other search dogs 1–7 serves several purposes. Data

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of meniscal injuries by use of arthroscopic examination in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injuries.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—94 dogs with 100 injured CCLs.

Procedure—Records for 94 large dogs (> 20 kg [44 lb]) with 100 naturally occurring CCL injuries that were examined arthroscopically were reviewed. Pathologic findings in the CCL (complete or partial tears), prevalence and type of meniscal injuries, and periarticular osteophytes were recorded.

Results—77% of joints had tears of the lateral meniscus; most were a series of small radial tears of the cranial horn. Fifty-eight percent of joints had tears of the medial meniscus. Positive correlation between complete tears of the CCL and medial meniscal damage was found. No significant relationships were detected between periarticular osteophyte formation and meniscal injury, medial and lateral meniscal injury, or degree of CCL tear and lateral meniscal injury.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—There is a strong association between CCL injury and lateral and medial meniscal injuries in dogs. Clinical importance of lateral meniscal lesions is not known; a much higher percentage of dogs had such injuries than has been reported previously, possibly because of use of arthroscopy. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221:1601–1604)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize rib, intrathoracic, and concurrent orthopedic injuries, and prognosis associated with traumatic rib fracture in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—75 cats.

Procedure—Medical records from January 1980 to August 1998 were examined for cats with traumatic rib fracture. Signalment, cause of trauma, interval from trauma to evaluation at a veterinary teaching hospital, referral status and date, method of diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, number and location of rib fractures, presence of flail chest, costal cartilage involvement, intrathoracic and concurrent orthopedic injury, and clinical outcome were reviewed.

Results—Median age was 3 years. Twenty-five (58%) cats with reported cause of trauma were injured by interaction with another animal. Fortyseven (78%) cats that were treated survived. Cats that died had a median duration of hospitalization of < 1 day. Ten (13%) cats had flail chest. Sixty-five (87%) cats had intrathoracic injury (median, 2 injuries). Nine (100%) cats without detected intrathoracic injury that were treated survived. Thirty-five (47%) cats had concurrent orthopedic injury. Cats with flail chest, pleural effusion, or diaphragmatic hernia were significantly more likely to die than cats without each injury.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Traumatic rib fracture in cats is associated with intrathoracic and concurrent orthopedic injury. Aggressive treatment of cats with traumatic rib fracture is warranted, because the prognosis is generally favorable. Diagnosis and treatment of intrathoracic injury associated with traumatic rib fracture in cats should precede management of concurrent orthopedic injury. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:51–54)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

included > 600 variables coded by state data abstractors who were trained according to CDC standards and used all available data sources; the variables included information on the manner of death, characteristics of injury and death, and weapons, suspects

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association