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, and the longer that a cat spends in a shelter environment, the greater its risk for the development of clinical signs of respiratory tract disease and subsequent euthanasia. 7,9–11 Current guidelines recommend the vaccination of all cats ≥ 4 weeks

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

—can enhance diversity and foster an environment where everyone feels they belong and can thrive. Efforts to advance equality and equity are creating positive changes in society, and we seek similar progress for veterinary medicine—a profession topping The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

environment. After the cats were admitted to the hospital (housed in groups of 2 or 3 and also allowed to interact as a group), spasticity appeared to be induced by exercise such as playing with each other or with toys, although stress caused by handling (eg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

males and 7 females) with IC were used. To evaluate the effect of the environment on ASRs in cats with and without IC, 11 healthy neutered cats (5 males and 6 females) and 16 cats with IC (8 males and 8 females) were used. These cats were a subset of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mechanism for this decrease in sodium transport is not completely understood, it seems likely that VFAs, which are highly lipid soluble in an acidic environment, diffuse into the squamous cells that line the nonglandular portion of the gastric mucosa and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

determine the efficacy of a protocol for managing UO in male cats that involved pharmacological manipulation, intermittent cystocentesis, and provision of a low-stress environment. We hypothesized that this protocol would allow for spontaneous resolution of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

patients for evidence of dietary indiscretion due to FB ingestion as repositioning of the patient may alter the environment surrounding the FB, causing it to appear starkly different on one projection versus another. There was substantial variation within

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To provide an epidemiologic investigation of the seroprevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in populations of cats and wild rodents in Rhode Island and to address the possible epidemiologic role of wild rodents in the spread of toxoplasmosis.

Animals—200 cats and 756 small wild rodents.

Procedure—Serum samples were obtained from 84 cats in animal shelters and 116 cats in veterinary hospitals. Serum samples were also obtained from 756 small wild rodents from multiple sites in Rhode Island. Sera from rodents and cats were assayed for antibodies to T gondii by use of the modified agglutination test

Results—Overall, 42% (84/200) of cats had serum antibodies to T gondii. Seroprevalence was not significantly different between stray (50%; 42 /84) versus client-owned (36%; 42/116) cats, between male (43%; 40/94) versus female (42%; 39/93) cats, or between indoor (26%; 7/27) versus outdoor (39%; 35/89) cats. Seroprevalence rate of trapped rodents was 0.8% (6/756). Six rodents captured in Washington County accounted for of the seropositive rodents. Four of 6 of the seropositive rodents were trapped at a single site in Washington County (an abandoned barn). Five stray cats, known to have resided at the same site in Washington County as 4 of the seropositive rodents, were also found to be seropositive for antibodies to T gondii.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Seroprevalence rate in rodents was not correlated with the seroprevalence rate in cats. Stray cats, especially those known to be feral, may be more likely to perpetuate the cat-mouse cycle of T gondii than clientowned cats. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1714–1717)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate associations between retention of dogs in their adoptive homes and attendance at puppy socialization classes and other factors.

Design—Epidemiologic survey.

Animals—248 adult dogs that were adopted as puppies from a humane society.

Procedure—Owners completed questionnaires regarding demographics, retention of the dogs in the homes, and the dogs' early learning events.

Results—Higher retention in the homes was reported for dogs that participated in humane society puppy socialization classes, were female, wore headcollars as puppies, were handled frequently as puppies, were more responsive to commands, slept on or near the owner's bed, or lived in homes without young children.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest several practices that veterinarians may recommend to enhance the likelihood that puppies will remain in their first homes, such as enrolling 7- to 12-week-old puppies in early learning and socialization classes. The lower rate of retention of dogs in homes with children emphasizes the importance of helping owners develop realistic expectations, knowledge, and effective tools to manage interactions between their children and dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003; 223:61–66)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

their natural environment. An inability to reliably measure disease burden (initial or change) in pets affects the diagnosis of disease and the development of new therapeutics. For example, a primary outcome measure currently used in regulatory, pivotal

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research