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horses. 1–3 Diagnosis of lameness can be facilitated by administration of local anesthetic solution within the DFTS, which can be necessary in horses that have little or no DFTS effusion. The distal sesamoidean ligaments, distal digital annular ligament

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of radiation therapy), the dog was examined again for dyspnea and gagging. Pericardial, thoracic, and abdominal effusion were identified. On echocardiographic evaluation, myocardial function appeared normal; however, there appeared to be right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

positioned more palmarly, compared with findings for the nonlame limb (B). There is also mild synovial effusion and synovial membrane proliferations in the dorsal recess of the DIPJ in the lame limb (D). Synovial effusion, periarticular bone remodeling

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, perioperative hematologic and biochemical testing, and perioperative peritoneal effusion cytology reports. The surgery report was reviewed for the date of surgery in relation to known trauma, confirmation of bile peritonitis, location of biliary tree rupture

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Mesenteric lymphangiography and thoracic duct ligation were performed on 19 cats with chylothorax between 1987 to 1992. Chylothorax was diagnosed on the basis of detection of chylomicrons in the pleural effusion or determination of a cholesterol concentration:triglyceride concentration ratio of < 1 in the pleural fluid. Preoperative medical treatment consisted of thoracentesis (19 of 19 cats) and feeding a fat-restricted diet (14 of 19 cats). Positive-contrast mesenteric lymphangiography was performed before thoracic duct ligation to identify an underlying cause for the effusion. Lymphangiectasia was diagnosed by use of radiography in 17 cats, none of which had evidence of a thoracic duct rupture. Thoracic duct ligation was performed via an incision made through the left 10th intercostal space. Lymphangiography was repeated immediately after ligation of the thoracic duct to document occlusion of all branches.

Follow-up monitoring was done for 12 to 47 months (median, 28 months) and consisted of physical examination, evaluation for clinical signs related to pleural effusion, and thoracic radiography. Ten of 19 (53%) cats had complete resolution of pleural effusion. Nonchylous effusion, localized in the right hemithorax, was detected in 1 cat 2 months after thoracic duct ligation, but resolved after thoracotomy, breakdown of thoracic adhesions, and expansion of the right cranial lung lobe. Chylous effusion resolved 3 to 7 days (mean, 5.4 days) after surgery in the 10 cats that survived > 12 months after surgery. Four cats died between 2 and 13 days after thoracic duct ligation, but pleural effusion had resolved in 3 of these 4 cats at the time of death. Five cats were euthanatized 8 to 36 days after surgery because of persistent chylous effusion after thoracic duct ligation.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

blood culture subsequently produced growth of Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus and Enterococcus spp. Thoracic and abdominal ultrasonography revealed severe hypoechoic bicavitary effusion. Moderate pleural roughening, peripheral lung

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

joint effusion and no obvious angular limb deformities. The tibial plateau angle was unchanged from the immediate postoperative measurement at 7°. Radiographic collimation did not allow measurement of the preoperative mechanical lateral distal femoral

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

throughout the abdomen (7/22 [31.8%] dogs), suggestive of peritoneal effusion. Table 2— Distribution (number of affected dogs) of imaging findings in 45 dogs with gallbladder disease and rupture. Variable Gallbladder disease (n = 45

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, or ascites determined to be of cardiac origin), and follow-up echocardiographic or ECG diagnoses (when available). For the purpose of the study reported here, all ferrets were reported as either male or female with no

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

revealed moderate pneumoperitoneum, mild corpuscular peritoneal effusion, and reactive mesenteric fat. Cytologic analysis of a peritoneal fluid sample obtained by abdominocentesis revealed intracellular bacteria consistent with septic peritonitis. Some of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association