Search Results

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 1,016 items for :

  • "owner reporting" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Abstract

Objective—To develop and evaluate a questionnaire (functional evaluation of cardiac health [FETCH] questionnaire) for assessing health-related quality of life in dogs with cardiac disease.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—360 dogs with cardiac disease.

Procedure—The questionnaire was developed on the basis of widely accepted clinical signs of cardiac disease in dogs. A FETCH score was calculated by summing responses to questionnaire items; possible scores ranged from 0 to 85. For questionnaire validation, owners of 60 dogs were asked to complete the questionnaire and provide an overall assessment of their dogs' quality of life (16 owners completed the questionnaire twice). Disease severity was assessed with the International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) classification for cardiac disease. Following validation, the final questionnaire was administered to owners of the remaining 300 dogs.

Results—Internal consistency of the questionnaire was good, and the FETCH score was significantly correlated with the owner-reported quality-of-life score and with ISACHC classification. For owners that completed the questionnaire twice, scores were significantly correlated. During the second phase of the study, the FETCH score ranged from 0 to 70 (median, 7) and was significantly correlated with ISACHC classification, but did not vary significantly with underlying disease. For dogs examined twice, the change in FETCH score was significantly greater for dogs in which ISACHC classification improved than for dogs in which ISACHC classification was unchanged.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the FETCH questionnaire is a valid and reliable method for assessing health-related quality of life in dogs with cardiac disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1864–1868)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of episioplasty for the treatment of perivulvar dermatitis or chronic or recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) believed to be secondary to excessive perivulvar skin folds in dogs and to document whether a causal relationship exists between the presence of chronic or recurrent UTI and excessive perivulvar skin folds in female dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—31 female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with vulvar dermatitis (group 1; n = 15) or UTI (group 2; 16) were reviewed for history, signalment, physical examination findings, hematologic findings, results of urine or vaginal bacteriologic culture, and results of additional diagnostic procedures.

Results—14 of 15 dogs in group 1 had complete resolution of perivulvar dermatitis and associated clinical signs following episioplasty. One dog had a relapse of clinical signs and vulvar dermatitis 2 years after surgery in association with a 9-kg (19.8-lb) weight gain. Sixteen of 16 dogs in group 2 had complete resolution of clinical signs of UTI following episioplasty. Urine samples were obtained via cystocentesis no earlier than 1 month after surgery to confirm resolution of UTI in 13 of 16 of dogs in group 2. Mild-to-moderate incisional swelling was the only surgical complication reported for either group, with the exception of 1 dog in group 2 that had wound dehiscence. All owners were satisfied with surgical outcomes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—All owners reported complete resolution of clinical signs for both groups of dogs. Episioplasty is an effective low morbidity treatment for perivulvar dermatitis and chronic UTI associated with excessive perivulvar skin folds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1577–1581)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—4 rabbits (1.5 to 6 years old) were evaluated at the Angell Animal Medical Center from June 2007 to March 2009 because of nonspecific clinical signs including anorexia, lethargy, and decreased fecal output.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed signs of pain in the cranial portion of the abdomen, gas distention of the gastrointestinal tract, and diminished borborygmi. Serum biochemical analyses and CBCs revealed moderately to markedly high alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase activities and mild to moderate anemia with polychromasia. Abdominal radiographic findings were nonspecific. Three of the 4 rabbits underwent abdominal ultrasonography; abnormalities in shape, size, echogenicity, and blood flow of the liver, indicative of liver lobe torsion, were detected.

Treatment and Outcome—All 4 rabbits underwent surgery, during which liver lobe torsion was confirmed and the affected liver lobe was resected. Histologic examination of sections of the excised lobe obtained from 3 of the 4 rabbits revealed severe, diffuse, acute to sub-acute hepatic ischemic necrosis. All rabbits recovered from surgery; owners reported that the rabbits were doing well 22 to 43 months after surgery.

Clinical Relevance—Liver lobe torsions in any species are rarely reported, yet 4 cases of liver lobe torsion in domestic rabbits were treated at 1 referral center in a 2-year period. In rabbits, clinical signs of this condition are nonspecific and results of additional tests, including abdominal ultrasonography and serum biochemical analysis, are necessary for diagnosis. Prompt diagnosis and hepatectomy of the affected lobe are recommended and appear to be associated with an excellent prognosis.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe clinical use of a locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) arthrodesis in horses and compare outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure as treatment for fracture of the middle phalanx (P2) versus other causes.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 29 client-owned horses.

PROCEDURES Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from 2008 through 2014 were reviewed to identify horses that underwent PIPJ arthrodesis of 1 limb. Signalment, surgical, and outcome-related variables were recorded. Owners were contacted from 1 to 6 years after surgery to determine rehabilitation time, current use of the horse, and overall owner satisfaction with the procedure. Success was determined on the basis of owner satisfaction and outcome for intended use. Variables of interest were compared statistically between horses that underwent surgery for P2 fracture versus other reasons.

RESULTS 14 horses underwent surgery for treatment of P2 fracture, and 15 had surgery because of osteoarthritis, subluxation, or osteochondrosis. Median convalescent time after surgery (with no riding or unrestricted exercise) was 7 months. Four horses were euthanized; of 23 known alive at follow-up, 22 were not lame, and 18 had returned to their intended use (8 and 10 at higher and lower owner-reported levels of work, respectively). Horses undergoing arthrodesis for reasons other than fracture were significantly more likely to return to their previous level of work. Twenty-two of 24 owners contacted indicated satisfaction with the procedure.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical arthrodesis of the PIPJ was successful in most horses of the study population. Various nuances of the system for fracture repair need to be understood prior to its use.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 2-year-old sexually intact female mixed-breed dog was evaluated at an emergency hospital approximately 5 hours after ingestion of an unknown amount of over-the-counter topical hair growth promoter containing 5% minoxidil foam. Vomiting and signs of lethargy were reported by the owner, and physical examination revealed tachycardia and hypotension. No treatments were performed, and the dog was transferred to a veterinary referral hospital for management of suspected minoxidil toxicosis.

CLINICAL FINDINGS On arrival at the referral hospital, the dog was tachycardic (heart rate, 200 to 220 beats/min) and hypotensive (systolic arterial blood pressure, 70 mm Hg). Electrocardiography revealed a regular, narrow-complex tachycardia with no evidence of ventricular ectopy.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Hypotension was effectively managed with a constant rate infusion of dopamine hydrochloride (12.5 μg/kg/min [5.7 μg/lb/min], IV). Once normotensive, the dog remained tachycardic and a constant rate infusion of esmolol hydrochloride (40 μg/kg/min [18.2 μg/lb/min], IV) was initiated for heart rate control. A lipid emulsion was administered IV as a potential antidote for the toxic effects of the lipophilic minoxidil, with an initial bolus of 1.5 mL/kg (0.7 mL/lb) given over 15 minutes followed by a continuous rate infusion at 0.25 mL/kg/min (0.11 mL/lb/min) for 60 minutes. While hospitalized, the dog also received maropitant citrate and ondansetron. Resolution of clinical signs was achieved with treatment, and the dog was discharged from the hospital 36 hours after admission. Four days later, the owner reported that the dog had made a full recovery and had returned to its typical behavior and activity level at home.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of successful clinical management of accidental minoxidil toxicosis in a dog.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of protamine zinc insulin (PZI) on control of glycemia in cats with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus or poorly controlled diabetes.

Design—Clinical trial.

Animals—67 diabetic cats.

Procedure—34 cats with newly diagnosed diabetes and 33 cats with poorly controlled diabetes were treated with PZI twice daily for 45 days. Control of glycemia was assessed on days 7, 14, 30, and 45 by evaluation of clinical response, change in body weight, serum fructosamine concentration, blood glucose concentration measured 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 hours after administration of PZI, lowest blood glucose concentration, and mean blood glucose concentration during the 9-hour period after administration. Adjustments in dosage of PZI were made as needed to attain control of glycemia.

Results—For all cats, a significant increase in mean dosage of PZI and significant decreases in 9-hour mean blood glucose concentration, lowest mean blood glucose concentration, and mean serum fructosamine concentration were detected. For cats with poorly controlled diabetes, 9-hour mean blood glucose concentration and mean serum fructosamine concentration were significantly decreased on day 45, compared with day 0. Ninety percent of owners reported improvement or resolution of clinical signs by day 45.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that PZI was effective for control of glycemia in cats with newly diagnosed or poorly controlled diabetes and may be used as an initial treatment or as an alternative treatment in cats that do not respond to treatment with other types of insulin. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:38–42)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate adequacy of analgesia provided by postoperative administration of butorphanol to cats undergoing onychectomy.

Design

Randomized controlled trial.

Animals

63 cats undergoing elective onychectomy.

Procedure

Cats were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 42) or control group (21). Cats in the treatment group were given butorphanol parenterally immediately and 4 hours after surgery and orally for 2 days after surgery. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate were recorded and scores were assigned for temperament, recovery, sedation, analgesia, and lameness for the first 24 hours after surgery. Owners provided scores for appetite, personality, and lameness the first and second days after discharge from the hospital.

Results

Heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, and temperament and sedation scores were not significantly different between groups at any evaluation time. Recovery scores were significantly better for butorphanol-treated than for control-group cats 10 minutes after extubation. Analgesia scores were significantly better for butorphanol-treated than for control-group cats between 5 and 24 hours after surgery. Fewer butorphanol-treated than control-group cats were lame at the time of discharge from the hospital. The first day after discharge, owners reported that percentages of butorphanol-treated cats that ate normally, acted normally, and had only mild or no lameness were significantly higher than percentages of control-group cats that did. Significant differences between groups were not detected the second day after discharge.

Clinical Implications

Results suggest that for cats undergoing onychectomy, administration of butorphanol the day of surgery and the first full day after surgery provides effective analgesia and improves recovery, appetite, and gait. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:246-250)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To develop modifications of the toggle pin procedure for use as a ligament of the head of the femur (LHF) prosthesis and to assess outcomes when used for coxofemoral luxation (CFL) in dogs with multiple orthopedic injuries.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Sample Population

14 dogs with CFL as a component of orthopedic polytrauma.

Procedure

Modifications to previous descriptions of the technique for use of a toggle pin for LHF prosthesis included deletion of the osteotomy of the greater trochanter in 12 of 16 joints with CFL, drilling of the femoral tunnel from a distal-to-proximal direction, deletion of a second femoral bone tunnel for suture placement, and use of a 2-hole polypropylene button to secure the LHF prosthetic suture.

Results

Mean age at time of injury, weight, and duration between injury and definitive surgery was 4.1 ± 1.1 years, 19.7 ± 2.8 kg, and 5.8 ± 2.7 days, respectively. Weightbearing began 3.0 ± 0.4 days after surgery. Mean postoperative follow-up period for dogs with maintained coxofemoral reduction of longer than 1 month (n = 13) was 19.5 ± 6.1 months. Owners reported good or excellent clinical results, which were confirmed by semi-quantitative assessment methods. Radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease were minimal. There was no significant difference between hind limbs when comparing mid-thigh limb circumference at the time of follow-up examination.

Clinical Implications

A modified toggle pin procedure for LHF prosthesis can maintain coxofemoral reduction and allow early weightbearing in dogs with coxofemoral luxation as a component of multiple orthopedic injuries.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine clinical signs, clinicopathologic abnormalities, radiographic findings, histologic abnormalities, and predisposing factors or diseases in cats with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE).

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

29 cats in which PTE was confirmed at necropsy.

Procedure

Information on signalment, body weight, history, results of physical examination, results of CBC and serum biochemical analyses, whether PTE was suspected prior to death, type of indwelling venous catheter and duration of venous catheterization, results of thoracic radiography, and whether cats had any concurrent diseases was obtained from medical records.

Results

PTE was identified in cats of various ages (median, 8.7 years), weights (median, 4.1 kg [9 lb]), and breeds. The most common owner-reported problems included lethargy (17 cats), anorexia (14), weight loss (10), and difficulty breathing (8); physical abnormalities included lethargy (21), tachypnea or dyspnea (16), and dehydration (13). Clinicopathologic abnormalities reflected concurrent or underlying diseases. Common radiographic abnormalities included pulmonary vessel abnormalities (11), pleural effusion (8), and peripheral noncircumscribed consolidations (6). Underlying or predisposing conditions, including cardiac disease (12), neoplasia (10), corticosteroid administration (8), disseminated intravascular coagulation (5), protein-losing nephropathy (4) or enteropathy (4), immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (2), and sepsis (2) were identified in all cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that PTE can develop in cats of any age, sex, or breed. Because PTE is a serious, potentially life-threatening disease, it should be suspected in cats with thoracic radiographic changes suggestive of uneven distribution of blood flow between lung lobes, especially in cats that have predisposing factors or diseases. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1650–1654)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To identify management factors affecting the risk of animals developing vesicular stomatitis (VS).

Design

Case-control study.

Animals

Horses, cattle, and sheep with suspected vesicular stomatitis on 395 premises in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona.

Procedure

Data were collected during the VS outbreak of 1997. Diagnosticians interviewed livestock owners and completed a supplemental questionnaire. Cases were defined as those premises that had a completed questionnaire and had ≥ 1 animal positive for VS. Control premises were all premises investigated that had a completed questionnaire and on which the animals had been tested but VS was not detected.

Results

Animals that had access to a shelter or barn had a reduced risk of developing VS (OR, 0.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.99). This effect was more pronounced for equine premises (OR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3 to 0.9). Conversely, during an adjusted analysis on equine premises, risk of developing disease was increased slightly where animals had access to pasture (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.7). On all premises where owners reported insect populations were greater than normal, odds of developing disease were significantly increased (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.47 to 4.47). Premises with animals housed < 0.25 miles from running water were more than twice as likely to have clinical signs of VS (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.32 to 5.0).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

These results support reports of others that suggest biting insects are a vector in VS virus transmission. Management practices to reduce exposure to biting insects might reduce the risk of VS. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1263–1268)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association