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The impact of MPL on hindlimb movement varies markedly among individual dogs. In some dogs, MPL is diagnosed without obvious clinical signs (occult MPL) 4 while others have a variety of clinical signs including severe lameness accompanied by femoral

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

concentration was superior to measurement of plasma ANP concentration for detection of occult CM. Nevertheless, a correlation between tissue ANP concentration and the thickness of the left ventricular posterior wall in diastole has been identified, and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

failure 7–10 and detect occult cardiac disease in high-risk populations, such as the elderly. 11,12 Currently, measurement of serum BNP concentration is recommended as one of the first steps in the evaluation of human patients suspected to have heart

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

administration of NSAIDs was performed on days 1 through 4. Two days before start of the study, endoscopy and a test to detect fecal occult blood f were performed on each dog. The stomach and proximal portion of the duodenum were endoscopically examined. An

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

examination of the left forelimb suggested soft tissue inflammation. Findings on cytologic examination of skin scrapings were unremarkable. Results of a heartworm antigen test for detection of occult infection and results of serologic analyses for detection of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fluid distension and persistent ruminal intramural gas ( Figure 3 ) . Differential diagnoses at this time included severe progressive ruminal stasis or pyloric outflow obstruction secondary to occult intraluminal foreign body or intussusception. The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reduced the likelihood that the periuria was related to lower urinary tract disease or feline idiopathic cystitis, although these conditions can be difficult to rule out. Bacteriologic culture of a urine sample was not performed, so an occult infection may

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

resulting from an occult migrating foreign body. The owner was informed that the prognosis for the dog was poor. Aggressive treatment involving surgical removal of the abscess and exploration of the possible area of entry of the bacterial infection within

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

revealed regenerative, hypochromic, microcytic anemia. After the dog was fed a hypoallergenic diet, a sample of its feces was positive for occult blood. At the referral evaluation, the dog was bright, alert, and responsive. Its mucous membranes were pink

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association