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against acetylsalicylic acid–induced gastric injury in 18 healthy mixed-breed dogs; the zinc l -carnosine compound did not prevent gastric lesions in that study. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate the efficacy of a commercially

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Equine sports are marred by injuries sustained by equine athletes. Ideally, affordable screening mechanisms would be available to assist in early identification of horses at risk. Most injuries in performance horses are believed to be the result

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

injury. Type II collagen and aggrecan make up most of the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage. Disruption of the extracellular matrix is the hallmark of osteoarthritis, and as a result, biomarker development has focused on identifying byproducts

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Twenty-two horses were examined because of firearm injuries. Nine had been shot with .22- caliber bullets, 2 with BB pellets, 6 with buckshot, 1 with a, 35-caliber bullet, and 1 with an airgun pellet. Injury was confined to the skin or skeletal muscles in 8 horses. Of these, 7 returned to their previous use. In 14 horses, injuries to additional structures were incurred, including the sinus and pharynx (n = 2), mandible (n = 1), tooth (n = 1), aorta (n = 1), eye (n = 3), tibia (n = 1), gastrointestinal tract (n = 3), joint (n = 1), and trachea (n = 1). The 3 horses that had only eye injuries were discharged to their owners. Of the other 11 horses with injuries to deep/vital structures, 3 died, 5 were euthanatized, and 3 survived.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors and

Documentation of illness and injury incurred by S&R and search-and-rescue dogs during and after deployment 1–9 provides data on medical issues and insight as to the nature of the risks involved for such dogs during operations. The information can

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the association between high-speed exercise and risk of injury while racing among Thoroughbreds in Kentucky.

Design—Matched case-control study.

Animals—206 Thoroughbreds that sustained a musculoskeletal injury while racing and 412 Thoroughbreds that were not injured during the same races.

Procedure—Data regarding official timed workouts and races and the Beyer's numbers for the 3 races before the race during which injury occurred were extracted from past performance charts and compared between injured horses and control horses.

Results—For injured horses, cumulative distance of high-speed exercise during the 1- and 2-month periods prior to the race in which injury occurred was significantly less than that of control horses; for either period, a difference of 10 furlongs was associated with approximately 2-fold greater risk of injury. Beyer's numbers were significantly higher for injured horses than for control horses. These effects remained significant after adjusting for age and results of prerace physical inspection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In Kentucky, injured horses had significantly less cumulative highspeed exercise than did control horses during the 1- and 2-month periods prior to the race in which injury occurred. These results differ from those observed in California. The association of injury with cumulative high-speed exercise appears to vary among regions in the United States. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000; 216:1273–1278)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Musculoskeletal injuries are the most frequent cause of wastage in race and sport horses, and the type and condition of the surface used for racing and training affect the occurrence and nature of injuries. 1–7 The incidence of severe or

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Injuries of the palmaroproximal aspect of the metacarpus are a well-recognized cause of lameness in performance horses of different disciplines. 1 – 3 Injury is thought to be a result of repetitive work-related trauma and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, extracellular release of ROS can induce indiscriminate injury to host tissues. 20–22 Several in vitro studies 23–27 have revealed that activated neutrophils induce direct injury to bovine mammary gland epithelium and that scavengers of ROS protect against this

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

inflammation. To our knowledge, the present report represents the first of intraorbital cyst formation after adnexal injury in birds. Cyst excision and evisceration failed to permanently resolve the cyst in the Rouen duck, likely owing to residual tear

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association