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gastrointestinal diseases and other debilitating conditions. Impaired venous drainage of the head and neck, particularly when bilateral, is suspected to limit athletic performance; thus, the objective of the study reported here was to evaluate the impact of jugular

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Phillips TJ Walmsley JP . Retrospective analysis of the results of 151 exploratory laparotomies in horses with gastrointestinal disease . Equine Vet J 1993 ; 25 : 427 – 431 . The author responds Thank you for the opportunity to respond

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Hypoadrenocorticism in dogs is an uncommon endocrinopathy, with population prevalences up to 0.09% (166/191,434) 3 , 4 and increasing up to 4% (6/151) 5 in dogs with signs of chronic gastrointestinal disease. Three previous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

body resulted in an excellent outcome. Common clinical signs of airway foreign bodies can be mistaken for respiratory or gastrointestinal disease, especially in cats. Misdiagnosis and delayed detection can result in unnecessary diagnostic tests or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in the intestines of clinically normal equids. Relatedly, the most common clinical sign of digestive disorders in horses is colic, which is defined as a gastrointestinal disease that causes signs of abdominal pain. 10,11 The incidence of colic in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

location of a mass. Ultrasonography is a useful technique for evaluating gastrointestinal diseases in small animals. Thickening of the gastric wall along with a loss of wall layering is the most common clinical sign of gastric neoplasia. 3 The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

infected with FCoV have only mild to inapparent gastrointestinal disease, a small subset develops the lethal disease feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). 1 Feline infectious peritonitis was first described by Holzworth 2 as chronic fibrinous peritonitis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease symptoms . Vet Pathol 2006 ; 43 : 1000 – 1003 10.1354/vp.43-6-1000 5 Van Kruiningen HJ Lees GE Hayden DW , et al. Lipogranulomatous lymphangitis in canine intestinal lymphangiectasia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with pulmonary or gastrointestinal disease, normal findings on thoracic radiography, and lack of lesions in either the lungs or gastrointestinal tract at necropsy made Cuterebra the most likely parasite. The Cuterebra genus of bot fly comprises

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intestinal mucosal lesions and fecal calprotectin concentrations in dogs with chronic diarrhea. Materials and Methods Dogs —Ninety-six adult dogs (69 healthy control dogs that had no signs of gastrointestinal disease and 27 dogs with chronic diarrhea

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research