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colostrum, maturation of metabolic processes, growth, and changes in volume of distribution and body composition. In addition to developmental effects on serum biochemical values, nutrition also plays a role. The neonatal intestine has high absorptive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

previous herd exposure to BVDV, determine titers of anti-BVDV antibodies in dams of initially seropositive crias, and ascertain whether individual seropositive crias had received supplemental colostrum at birth. Materials and Methods Experimental

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

commonly used vaccines are multivalent and contain several viral antigens or bacterins that supply bacterial antigens. Another important role of vaccines is to supply antibody protection in colostrum to the offspring. Colostrum quality is dependent on the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, and IgA in calves at birth has been reported. 5,6 In one of those studies, 6 37% of calves had detectable immunoglobulin concentrations in samples obtained before ingestion of colostrum; however, the lower limit for the detection of immunoglobulins

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

containing EDTA. e For foals born to the 30 pregnant mares during the 2006 foaling season, samples were collected prior to suckling and at 12 to 24 hours of age. In addition, a colostrum sample was collected from the mare prior to nursing and placed in a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

responses to both the viral surface and core antigens. Consequently, serologic tests for BLV performed on calves that ingest colostrum from BLV-infected cows will yield positive results, regardless of the infection status of the calves. Results of a previous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

study used colostrum-deprived calves. Therefore, IN administration of an MLV vaccine appears to be an effective vaccination method in newborn calves, but questions remain as to whether maternally derived antibodies interfere with induction of immune

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of adult cat serum as an immunoglobulin supplement in kittens with failure of passive transfer.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—11 specific pathogen-free queens and their 43 kittens.

Procedure—Kittens were removed from the queens at birth, prior to suckling colostrum, and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: colostrum-deprived, colostrum-fed, colostrum-deprived and administration of pooled adult cat serum IP, and colostrum-deprived and administration of pooled adult serum SC. Colostrum-fed kittens were returned to the queen and allowed to suckle normally. Colostrum-deprived kittens were isolated from the queen and fed a kitten milk replacer for 2 days to prevent absorption of colostral IgG. All colostrum-deprived kittens were returned to the queen on day 3. Serum IgG concentrations were measured by radial immunodiffusion in the kittens at birth and 2 days and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after birth.

Results—None of the kittens had detectable serum IgG at birth. Both IP and SC administration of adult cat serum resulted in peak serum IgG concentrations equivalent to those in kittens that suckled normally. Untreated colostrum-deprived kittens did not achieve serum IgG concentrations comparable to those for kittens in the other groups until 6 weeks of age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that adult cat serum may be used as an immunoglobulin supplement in colostrum-deprived kittens. Although the minimum concentration of IgG necessary to protect kittens from infection is unknown, concentrations achieved were comparable to those in kittens that suckled normally. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1401–1405)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Epidermal growth factor (egf)-like activity was measured in mares’ colostrum and milk by radioreceptor assay. Milk samples were collected from 22 mares 1 or more times during early lactation. Samples of colostrum were taken after parturition and before the foal first suckled (presuckle), within 6 hours after the foal first suckled (postsuckle), and on days 1, 2, 4, and 8 of lactation. In the 5 mares from which milk samples were obtained at each sampling time, presuckle colostral mean egf-like activity (17.8 ng/ml) was greatest (P < 0.05). The mean values for egf-like activity at all other sampling times were not significantly different from each other (postsuckle colostrum, 9.7 ng/ml; day 1, 9.6 ng/ml; day 2, 8.5 ng/ml; day 4, 8.0 ng/ml; day 8, 7.8 ng/ml).

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research