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%]), lymphosarcoma (1/5), and sarcoma (1/1). Six of 50 (12%) horses were euthanized, and outcome was significantly ( P = 0.007) associated with partial excision of the third eyelid prior to referral. Discussion Squamous cell carcinoma was the tumor most

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

accident (1 stallion). A gelding was admitted to the hospital for treatment of priapism that developed subsequent to administration of acepromazine, and 3 geldings were admitted for squamous cell carcinoma of the glans penis, urethral process, free portion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

examination. Clinical signs, duration of clinical signs prior to presentation, and tumor location are summarized ( Table 1 ) . The most commonly identified neoplasms were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) followed by thymoma and mammary carcinoma. Table 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

predisposition. Squamous cell carcinomas were the second most common tumor in the data set. Appaloosas were 8.0 (95% CI, 6.3 to 10.2) and American Paint Horses were 4.6 (95% CI, 3.7 to 5.7) times as likely as all other horses to have SCC. Males were 1.7 (95% CI

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

), Arabian (60), American Paint Horse (56), and Appaloosa (51). Tumor histologic types included sarcoid (409 tumors in 386 horses), squamous cell carcinoma (151 in 144 horses), STS (in 28 horses), cutaneous lymphoma (26 in 10 horses), and melanoma (16 in 13

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a broad-based opacity consistent with an esophageal mass. No evidence of pneumonia was detected. A diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was made on the basis of histologic evaluation of endoscopic biopsy samples. The dog was discharged from the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

decreases recurrence and prolongs remission; however, most cats succumb to recurrent disease despite treatment. 2 , 4 , 5 Feline oral squamous cell carcinomas (FOSCC) account for 60% to 70% of feline malignant oral tumors and are invasive of surrounding

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

evidence of a palpable mass or thickening during palpation of the neck. In the other 2 cats, palpation of the neck resulted in coughing or worsening of the dyspnea. Causes of upper airway obstruction included neoplasia (squamous cell carcinoma [n = 6] or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 117 dogs with digit masses were reviewed. Of 124 digit masses, 76 (61%) were malignant neoplasms, 25 (20%) were benign neoplasms, and 23 (19%) were pyogranulomatous inflammation. Of 29 digits with radiographic evidence of bone lysis, 24 (83%) were affected by malignant masses, whereas only 5 of 29 (17%) digits with radiographic evidence of bone lysis were affected by benign or pyogranulomatous masses. Only 1 of 19 (5%) dogs with melanoma had radiographic evidence of lysis, but 20 of 25 (80%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma had radiographic evidence of bone lysis. Thoracic radiographs of 95 dogs were available. Six of 19 (32%) dogs with melanoma had radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis, whereas 3 of 24 (13%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma had radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Twenty-nine digit neoplasms were squamous cell carcinoma, and 19 of 29 (66%) arose from the subungual epithelium. Of 19 dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the subungual epithelium, 18 (95%) survived for at least 1 year, whereas only 6 of 10 (60%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating in other parts of the digit survived for at least 1 year. Furthermore, of 19 dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the subungual epithelium, 14 (74%) survived at least 2 years, whereas only 4 of 9 (44%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating in other parts of the digit survived for 2 years. Dogs with melanoma of the digits had a median survival time of 12 months, with 10 of 24 (42%) alive at 1 year and 3 of 23 (13%) alive at 2 years. Dogs with mast cell tumor of the digits had a median survival time of 20 months, with 7 of 8 (88%) dogs alive at 1 year and 4 of 8 (50%) alive at 2 years.

Analysis of the results of the study reported here indicated that the prevalence of neoplasms in dogs with digit masses was high. Malignant neoplasms were more prevalent than benign neoplasms, with the most commonly identified types being squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Radiographic evidence of bone lysis was seen in dogs with all types of masses but was more commonly associated with squamous cell carcinoma than with melanoma. Dogs with melanoma of the digit had a higher prevalence of pulmonary metastasis and a poorer prognosis than dogs with squamous cell carcinoma.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

admitted to the Section of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, Switzerland for radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal planum (13 cats [group 1]) or vaccine-associated sarcoma (24 cats [group 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association