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, with less bone being laid down overall than is being absorbed. 1 This radiologic pattern represents an aggressive, fast-growing lesion such as osteomyelitis or neoplasia. 1 In addition, endosteal scalloping, as observed in this cat, may represent the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of serum concentrations of biochemical markers of bone metabolism (osteocalcin [OC], bone-specific alkaline phosphatase [BS-ALP], and deoxypyridinoline [DPYR]) to compare healing in infected versus noninfected fractures and in fractures with normal repair versus delayed (nonunion) repair in rabbits.

Animals—32 female 9- to 10-month-old New Zealand White rabbits.

Procedure—A femoral fracture defect was made in each rabbit. Rabbits were assigned to the following groups: the bone morphogenetic-2 gene treatment group with either noninfected nonunion or infected (ie, inoculation of defects with Staphylococcus aureus) nonunion fractures or the luciferase (control) gene treatment group with either noninfected nonunion or infected nonunion fractures. Serum samples were obtained before surgery (time 0) and 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after surgery. Callus formation and lysis grades were evaluated radiographically at 16 weeks.

Results—Serum OC and BS-ALP concentrations decreased from time 0 at 4 weeks, peaked at 8 weeks, and then decreased. Serum DPYR concentration peaked at 4 weeks and then decreased, independent of gene treatment group or fracture infection status. Compared with rabbits with noninfected fractures, those with infected fractures had lower serum OC and BS-ALP concentrations at 4 weeks, higher serum OC concentrations at 16 weeks, and higher serum DPYR concentrations at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Combined serum OC, BS-ALP, and DPYR concentrations provided an accuracy of 96% for prediction of fracture infection status at 4 weeks.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Measurement of multiple serum biochemical markers of bone metabolism could be useful for clinical evaluation of fracture healing and early diagnosis of osteomyelitis. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;64:727–735)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To identify factors affecting the prognosis for survival and athletic use in foals with septic arthritis.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

93 foals with septic arthritis.

Procedure

Medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical findings, laboratory test results, radiographic findings, treatment method, and outcome. Race records for Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds were evaluated to determine whether foals subsequently raced and whether they raced successfully.

Results

43 foals had 1 affected joint, 44 foals had multiple affected joints, and number of affected joints was not recorded for 6 foals. The femoropatellar and tarsocrural joints were most commonly affected. Osteomyelitis or degenerative joint disease were detected in 59% (46/78) of foals. Failure of passive transfer, pneumonia, and enteritis were common. Foals were treated with lavage, lavage and intra-articular administration of antibiotics, lavage and arthroscopic debridement with or without partial synovectomy, or lavage and arthrotomy to debride infected bone and systemic administration of antibiotics. Seventy-three foals survived to be discharged from hospital, and approximately a third raced. Isolation of Salmonella spp from synovial fluid was associated with an unfavorable prognosis for survival and multisystem disease was associated with an unfavorable prognosis for survival and ability to race; other variables were not significantly associated with survival and ability to race.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

With treatment, the prognosis for survival of foals with septic arthritis was favorable, whereas prognosis for ability to race was unfavorable. Multisystem disease, isolation of Salmonella spp from synovial fluid, involvement of multiple joints, and synovial fluid neutrophil count ≥ 95% at admission may be of prognostic value. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:973–977)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

periosteal proliferation with intraperiosteal and subperiosteal multifocal pyogranulomatous osteomyelitis and Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon of the mandibles with mild, chronic perivascular to interstitial dermatitis of the overlying skin; reactive

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, 10–12 , and infection. 13,14 To our knowledge, pressure osteolysis caused by a foreign body that is not a surgical implant has not been reported in dogs and cats. Osteomyelitis is a recognized condition in veterinary medicine and is defined as an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

right hip joint dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. The small oval radiolucency in the right hip joint acetabulum may be a lytic lesion suggestive of osteomyelitis. Comments The dog underwent surgery for a femoral head and neck ostectomy of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

days following onset of illness, even if clinical signs resolve before 21 days. See page 1022 Surgical management of maxillary and premaxillary osteomyelitis in a reticulated python A 1-year-old reticulated python ( Python reticulatus ) was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was evident but only on the caudocranial projection. On the basis of findings, our primary differential diagnoses included osteomyelitis with potential septic arthritis of the right stifle joint, an unusually irregular subchondral cystic lesion with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnoses for this aggressive bone lesion were bacterial or fungal osteomyelitis, with primary or metastatic neoplasia less likely. Treatment and Outcome Cytologic evaluation of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirates of the lytic lesion of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

were consistent with apical periodontitis at the distal root of the right mandibular first molar tooth, with bone sequestration and chronic osteomyelitis. 2 The solid periosteal reaction on the ventral aspect of the mandible was considered likely

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association