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were recruited for participation through the medical oncology service at the PUVTH in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical trial comparing the incidence and severity of GI AEs in dogs with cancer treated with piroxicam

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To develop a direct assay to measure platelet surface-associated immunoglobulins (PSAIg) in dogs and to determine whether the assay is useful in the diagnosis of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT).

Animals—20 healthy dogs were used to develop reference intervals, and 23 dogs with IMT and 17 with non-IMT were used to evaluate the clinical use of this assay.

Procedure—After optimization of platelet collection and assay conditions, concentrations of PSAIg were measured, using radiolabeled staphylococcal protein A (SpA) and polyclonal antibodies against canine IgG (anti-γ) and IgM (anti-µ). Concentrations of PSAIg were expressed as the percentage of radiolabeled immunoglobulin detector bound.

Results—Cut-off values (mean + 3 SD) were as follows: SpA, 1.1%; anti-γ, 1.3%; and anti-µ, 3.5%. Values greater than these cut-off values were considered positive. Values determined by use of radiolabeled SpA for all dogs with IMT were greater than the cut-off value; values were considered high positives (> 5 times cut-off value) for 22 of these 23 dogs. Although 9 of 17 dogs with non-IMT also had PSAIg concentrations greater than the cut-off value, values were considered high positives for only 3 of these 9 dogs.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The immunoradiometric assay developed is a reliable and sensitive method to detect PSAIg in dogs. However, to obtain accurate results, optimum temperature, time, and storage conditions must be used. Detection of increased concentrations of PSAIg in dogs presumed to have non-IMT should alert clinicians to reconsider an immune-mediated basis for the thrombocytopenia. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:124–136)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, Research Triangle Park, NC. References 1. Withrow SJ . Tumors of the gastrointestinal tract . In: Withrow SJ Vail DM , eds. Small animal clinical oncology . 4th ed. Edinburgh : Saunders , 2007 ; 477 – 479 . 2. Head KW Else RW

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

—The study proposal was approved by the Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology Research Committee. Participating members of the Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology were asked to search their medical record databases for dogs that weighed ≤ 15 kg in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate responses of cats with vaccine- associated sarcomas to treatment with surgery and radiotherapy, with or without adjunctive chemotherapy.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—76 cats (78 tumors).

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed. Factors potentially associated with survival time, time to recurrence, and time to development of metastases were evaluated.

Results—Following excision, electron beam radiation, and, in some cases, chemotherapy, 32 (41%) cats experienced recurrence, and 9 (12%) cats developed metastases. One- and 2-year survival rates were 86 and 44%, respectively. Median survival time from onset of disease was 730 days (range, 30 to 2,014 days). Median disease-free interval was 405 days (range, 30 to 925 days). Cats that underwent only 1 surgery prior to radiotherapy had a lower recurrence rate than did cats that underwent > 1 surgery and had a significantly longer disease-free interval. Survival time and disease-free interval decreased as time between surgery and the start of radiotherapy increased. Cats that developed metastases had significantly shorter survival times and disease-free intervals than did cats that did not develop metastases. Castrated male cats had a significantly shorter survival time than did spayed female cats. Cats with larger tumors prior to the first surgery had shorter survival times. Twenty-six cats received chemotherapy in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. Whether cats received chemotherapy was not associated with recurrence rate, metastasis rate, or survival time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that excision followed by electron beam irradiation may be beneficial for treatment of cats with vaccine- associated sarcomas. Extent of excision prior to radiotherapy did not seem to be associated with recurrence rate. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1582–1589)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxic effects of a conservative dose of cisplatin administered in combination with piroxicam to dogs with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder.

Design—Clinical trial (nonrandomized, noncontrolled).

Animals—14 client-owned dogs with histologically confirmed TCC of the urinary bladder.

Procedures—Each dog was treated with cisplatin (50 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d [reduced to 40 mg/m2, IV, q 21 d because of toxic effects]) and piroxicam (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h). A CBC, serum biochemical analyses, and urinalysis were performed prior to each cisplatin treatment. Tumor staging (determined from thoracic and abdominal radiographic and urinary bladder ultrasonographic findings) was performed before treatment and at 6-week intervals during treatment.

Results—5 dogs received only 1 dose of cisplatin because of the rapid progression of disease (n = 2) or toxic effects (3). With regard to the neoplastic disease among the other 9 dogs, 1 had partial remission, 5 had stable disease, and 3 had progressive disease after 6 weeks of treatment. Median progression-free interval was 78 days (range, 20 to 112 days). Median survival time was 307 days (range, 29 to 929 days). Moderate to severe renal toxicosis and moderate to severe gastrointestinal toxicosis developed in 5 and 8 dogs, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Because of minimal efficacy and associated renal and gastrointestinal toxicosis, administration of cisplatin (40 to 50 mg/m2) with piroxicam cannot be recommended for treatment of dogs with TCC of the urinary bladder.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

: Withrow SJ , MacEwan EG , eds. Small animal clinical oncology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia : WB Saunders Co , 2001 ; 261 – 282 . 2 Macy DW . Canine and feline mast cell tumors: biologic behavior, diagnosis, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2007 ; 37 : 755 – 773 . 10.1016/j.cvsm.2007.03.008 2. Bailey DB Page RL . Tumors of the endocrine system . In: Withrow SJ Vail DM , eds. Withrow & McEwan's small animal oncology . 4th ed. St Louis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

: Iowa State Press , 2002 ; 547 – 573 . 4. Sorenmo KU Worley DR Goldschmidt MH . Tumors of the mammary gland . In: Withrow SJ , Vail DM , Page RL , eds. Withrow and MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology . 5th ed. St Louis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association