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Introduction Lameness is a common and economically important disease that affects cattle on beef and dairy operations throughout the US. Indeed, recent studies have estimated that prevalence of lameness in North American dairy herds to range

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Traumatic arthritis and osteoarthritis may be the most common cause of lameness in equine athletes of all types. 1 In the Thoroughbred racehorse industry worldwide, musculoskeletal injury accounts for the highest proportion of days lost from

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine the relationship between lameness and milk yield in dairy cows.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—531 dairy cows.

Procedure—Cows affected with lameness were classified into 1 of 3 groups on the basis of type of diseases or lesions observed, including interdigital phlegmon (foot rot), papillomatous digital dermatitis (foot warts), or claw lesions. Cows not affected with lameness were classified as healthy. From Dairy Herd Improvement Association records, 305-day mature equivalent milk yield data were collected at the end of lactation or when the cow left the herd. Milk yield was compared between cows affected with lameness and healthy cows.

Results—167 (31%) cows were affected with lameness during lactation. Lame cows had claw lesions (60%), papillomatous digital dermatitis (31%), or interdigital phlegmon (9%). Milk yield in lame cows with interdigital phlegmon (mean, 17,122 lb) was significantly less, compared with healthy cows (19,007 lb).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In this herd, interdigital phlegmon was associated with a 10% decrease in milk production. Lame cows with claw lesions or papillomatous digital dermatitis produced less milk than healthy cows, but the difference was not significant. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:640–644)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

neurovascular bundle) at the base of the proximal sesamoid bones would ameliorate lameness caused by pain within the region innervated by this nerve. Materials and Methods Animals Six horses with naturally occurring lameness obtained from the teaching

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare milk yield among cows classified as nonlame, moderately lame, and lame and to examine the relationship between severity of lameness and milk yield in cows classified as lame during the first 100 days after parturition.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Animals—465 Holstein cows.

Procedure—Cows were examined weekly during the first 100 days after parturition and assigned a lameness score by use of a 6-point locomotion scoring system (ie, 0 to 5). Milk yield was compared among cows classified as nonlame, moderately lame, and lame. Among cows classified as lame (locomotion score ≥ 4), milk yield was compared for cows with low, medium, and high cumulative locomotion scores. Cows classified as lame were further examined on a tilt table for diagnosis and treatment of lameness.

Results—84 (18%), 212 (46%), and 169 (36%) cows were classified as nonlame, moderately lame, and lame, respectively. Among cows in their second or later lactations, milk yield in lame cows was significantly lower than that in moderately lame and nonlame cows. In addition, among cows classified as lame, milk yield was significantly lower in cows with high locomotion scores during the first 100 days after parturition, compared with cows with low scores. Most (58%) cows classified as lame had laminitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate a linear relationship between increasing degree of lameness and decreasing milk yield among cows in their second or later lactations. The locomotion scoring system used in this study may be a useful management tool that veterinarians and dairy farmers could adopt for early detection of lameness in dairy cows. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1292–1296)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare calving-to-conception intervals among cows classified as nonlame, moderately lame, or lame during the prebreeding postpartum period and to examine the relationship between severity of lameness and time to conception in cows that were classified as lame.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Animals—499 Holstein cows.

Procedure—Cows in the prebreeding postpartum period were classified as nonlame, moderately lame, or lame by use of a 6-point locomotion scoring system. Time to conception (days) was compared among cows. A low, medium, or high cumulative locomotion score was assigned to lame cows, and time to conception among those cows was compared. Cows classified as lame were examined on a tilt table for diagnosis and treatment of lameness.

Results—154 (31%), 214 (43%), and 131 (26%) cows were classified as nonlame, moderately lame, and lame, respectively. Most cows classified as lame had laminitis (54%) or disorders of the claw (33%). Median time to conception was 36 to 50 days longer in lame cows than in nonlame cows. Among lame cows, the median time to conception was 66 days longer in cows with high cumulative locomotion scores than in cows with low scores.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Nonlame cows became pregnant more quickly than lame cows. Lame cows with low cumulative locomotion scores during the prebreeding postpartum period became pregnant sooner than lame cows with high scores. Early diagnosis and intervention may mitigate the effects of lameness and improve reproductive performance in lame dairy cows. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1284–1291)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize compensatory movements of the head and pelvis that resemble lameness in horses.

Animals—17 adult horses.

Procedure—Kinematic evaluations were performed while horses trotted on a treadmill before and after shoe-induced lameness. Lameness was quantified and the affected limb determined by algorithms that measured asymmetry in vertical movement of the head and pelvis. Induced primary lameness and compensatory movements resembling lameness were assessed by the Friedman test. Association between induced lameness and compensatory movements was examined by regression analysis.

Results—Compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb were seen with induced lameness of a hind limb. There was less downward and less upward head movement during and after the stance phase of the ipsilateral forelimb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the hind limb increased severity of the compensatory movements in the ipsilateral forelimb by 50%. Compensatory movements resembling lameness of the hind limb were seen after induced lameness in a forelimb. There was less upward movement of the pelvis after the stance phase of the contralateral hind limb and, to a lesser extent, less downward movement of the pelvis during the stance phase of the ipsilateral hind limb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the forelimb increased compensatory movements of the contralateral hind limb by 5%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Induced lameness in a hind limb causes prominent compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb. Induced lameness in a forelimb causes slight compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral and contralateral hind limbs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:646–655)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

History A 5-year-old male neutered Labrador Retriever was presented to an academic referral institution for further evaluation of chronic, progressive right hind limb lameness. Approximately 4 months prior to presentation, the dog developed a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

In this double-blind study, the effectiveness of and dose response to intra-articular administration of modified hyaluronan (hylan) was determined in an equine carpal lameness model over a 23-day period, using a computerized three-dimensional motion analysis system, synovial fluid variables, and synovial histologic examination.

In 24 clinically sound horses, baseline motion data was acquired from horses trotting at 4 m/s on a high-speed treadmill. Then, to induce lameness, 25 mg of amphotericin B in 5 ml of sterile water was injected into the left middle carpal joint of each horse every other day for 3 treatments. Phenybutazone (2.2 mg/kg of body weight, PO, once) and butorphanol tartrate (0.1 mg/kg, IM, q 6 h, for 36 hours) were used to control signs of discomfort. Horses were assigned at random to 4 equal groups and received intracarpal administration of either 1, 2, 4 ml of hylan (8 mg/ml), or 2 ml of balanced electrolyte solution (control).

Intracarpal administration of amphotericin B caused significant (P ≤ 0.01) increase in subjective lameness grades over the 2-week evaluation period, and hylan administration did not significantly (P ≤ 0.01) change the subjective lameness grade. Lameness induction caused significant (P ≤ 0.01) decrease in head and withers excursions during the lame forelimb support phase and significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in head and withers excursions during the sound forelimb support phase. Synovitis induction was further characterized by significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in total wbc, polymorphonuclear, and large and small mononuclear cell numbers, and synovial fluid total protein concentrations. Also, subjective scores for synovial sections were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) different from baseline values, but hylan treatment at the 1-, 2-, or 4-ml dose did not significantly (P ≤ 0.05) alter these variables, compared with baseline values or values in control horses. Hyaluronan concentrations were not altered by induction of synovitis or hylan treatment.

Although clinical use of hyaluronan for treatment of traumatic joint disease in horses is well accepted, the beneficial effect of hylan was not detectable in this study. Further studies are required to more fully characterize the possible beneficial effects of hyaluronan-based products for treatment of joint disease in equids.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine the relationship between lameness and the duration of the interval from calving to subsequent conception in lactating dairy cows.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—837 dairy cows.

Procedure—Cows affected with lameness were classified into 1 of 4 groups on the basis of types of disease or lesions observed, including foot rot, papillomatous digital dermatitis, claw lesions, or multiple lesions. Cows not affected with lameness were classified as healthy. Time from calving to conception was compared between lame cows and healthy cows.

Results—254 (30%) cows were affected with lameness during lactation. Most lame cows (59%) had claw lesions. Lame cows with claw lesions were 0.52 times as likely to conceive as healthy cows. Median time to conception was 40 days longer in lame cows with claw lesions, compared with healthy cows. Number of breedings per conception for lame cows with claw lesions was significantly higher than that for healthy cows.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Claw lesions were the most important cause of lameness, impairing reproductive performance in dairy cows, as indicated by a higher incidence of affected cows and a greater time from calving to conception and a higher number of breedings required per conception, comp ared with healthy cows. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001; 218:1611–1614)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association