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consistent with, but not definitive for, a colonic torsion. Treatment and Outcome A sample of peritoneal effusion was collected by abdominocentesis; in-house cytologic evaluation revealed marked neutrophilia with no apparent intracellular bacteria

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

obstruction and secondary lung lobes collapse followed by pneumonia, specifically necrotizing pneumonia (given the vesicular component), and chronic effusion with adhesions (eg, pyothorax). Figure 2 Same images as in Figure 1 . There are circular gas

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

transducer. Diagnostic imaging findings were indicative of neoplasia of the left kidney with abdominal effusion; differential diagnoses included renal carcinoma, histiocytic sarcoma, and lymphoma. Nephroblastoma was considered less likely because of the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.1 × 7.3 × 9.5 cm. Adjacent to this mass was an anechoic cystic and cavitated region within the spleen measuring up to 2.3 × 2.1 cm with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. There was mild lymphadenopathy. Encapsulated anechoic effusion was observed along

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

musculoskeletal evaluation of the right forelimb revealed mild effusion within the metacarpophalangeal joint, digital flexor tendon sheath, and elbow joint. On lameness evaluation, the horse had left forelimb (grade 1/5 1 ) and right hind limb (grade 2/5 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to acutely severe lameness (grade 4 on a scale of 0 to 5) with swelling in the region of the metatarsophalangeal joint (fetlock joint) approximately 3 weeks before referral. On referral examination, the gelding had moderate to marked effusion and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

findings are consistent with pneumothorax. The diaphragm appears caudally displaced and flattened. A bullous-appearing gas opacity with a thin, outer soft-tissue opaque rim, possibly representing pleural thickening or scant pleural effusion, is evident

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

obtained radiographic images of the abdomen were reviewed; no evidence of a gastrointestinal obstruction was seen. Ultrasonography of the abdomen and thorax was performed; no evidence of free fluid, pericardial effusion, or pleural effusion was found

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, less likely, neoplasia or bacterial abscesses. The curvilinear soft tissue opacities were consistent with thickening of the caudal thoracic air sac (airsacculitis) and concurrent coelomitis or neoplastic effusion. Treatment and Outcome The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

). Figure 2— Same radiographic images as in Figure 1 . Notice the solitary fetus with a mineralized skeleton in the cranial aspect of the abdomen (white arrowhead). No evidence of a uterus or signs of peritoneal effusion are evident. No radiographic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association