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2010 ; 185 : 317 – 321 . 10.1016/j.tvjl.2009.06.008 14. Asano K , Masuda K , Okumura M , et al. Plasma atrial and brain natriuretic peptide levels in dogs with congestive heart failure . J Vet Med Sci 1999 ; 61 : 523 – 529 . 10

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

gene has not been among the genes studied to date. ABBREVIATIONS CHF Congestive heart failure cTnT Cardiac troponinT DCM Dilated cardiomyopathy MYBP-C Myosin-binding protein C MYHC β-Myosin heavy chain NCBI National Center for

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

ANP Atrial natriuretic peptide BNP B-type natriuretic peptide CHF Congestive heart failure CM Cardiomyopathy CNP C-type natriuretic peptide HCM Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy LA:Ao Diameter of the left atrium to the diameter of the aorta Nt

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

was performed at the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Teramo and Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences University of Bologna. ABBREVIATIONS AUC Area under the curve CHF Congestive heart failure CI Confidence

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

recommendations, interobserver variability was not evaluated and, therefore, cannot be excluded as a potential bias. ABBREVIATIONS ANP Atrial natriuretic peptide AUC Area under the curve BNP B-type natriuretic peptide CHF Congestive heart failure

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Allophycocyanin-conjugated anti-CD61 antibody CD62-PE Phycoerythrin-conjugated anti-CD62 antibody CHF Congestive heart failure FSSP Flow cytometry scatterplot subpopulation iLVIDd Indexed end-diastolic left ventricular internal dimension IQR

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

A technique for transvenous endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle was developed and evaluated for safety and efficacy in healthy dogs and dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy positioned in lateral recumbency. This technique allowed acquisition of multiple biopsy specimens from the right ventricle of each of 22 hemodynamically normal dogs and 40 of 42 dogs with congestive heart failure. In 2 dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy, transvenous access to the right ventricle could not be achieved, but left ventricular biopsy was performed without complication. Complications were infrequent, and dogs recovered to at least their baseline status within 48 hours. Evaluation of the efficacy and complication rate of the procedure with each of the 2 biopsy instruments currently available identified no differences between them.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Population characteristics, risk factors, and survival characteristics were evaluated in 74 cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (hc) seen at North Carolina State University veterinary teaching hospital from 1985 to 1989, and compared with 82 clinically normal cats. The mean (± sd) age of cats with HC was 6.5 (4.0) years. Neutered males were at significantly greater risk (odds ratio 3.1) than neutered females. Breed, body weight, or coat color were not determined to be risk factors for hc. Tricolor cats were significantly underrepresented, probably reflecting the male predisposition for hc and not a true risk reduction associated with coat color. Forty-one cats were without clinical signs of heart disease (murmur and/or gallop sound only), 24 were in congestive heart failure, and 9 had systemic arterial embolism, 3 of which had concomitant congestive heart failure.

The median survival time for 61 cats with HC, for which survival information could be obtained and that were not euthanatized on day 1, was 732 days. Survival was not affected by age at diagnosis, breed, body weight, or sex. However, clinical signs were important in determining prognosis; cats with heart rates < 200 beats/min survived significantly longer (median survival > 1,830 days) than those with heart rates ≥ 200 beats/min (median survival = 152 days). Cats without clinical signs (median survival > 1,830 days) survived longer than those with clinical signs, and cats in heart failure survived a median of 92 days, compared with 61 days for those with systemic arterial embolism. Analysis of survival revealed no significant difference between the 2 groups of cats with clinical signs; however, all cats with embolism and only 60% of cats with heart failure were dead 6 months after diagnosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess signal-averaged electrocardiography (SAECG) for evaluation of Boxers with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and identify dogs at risk for sudden death (SD) or death related to congestive heart failure (CHF).

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—94 Boxers with ARVC and 49 clinically normal non-Boxers (controls).

Procedure—Boxers were screened for ARVC, and severity was estimated by use of echocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory ECG, and SAECG. Statistical evaluation was performed to identify significant differences in SAECG variables relative to clinical outcome, frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, and systolic function. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were evaluated for each SAECG variable for occurrence of SD or death related to CHF. Late potentials were also evaluated as a predictor of cardiac-related death.

Results—Differences were detected in SAECG variables on the basis of clinical outcome, systolic function, and frequency of ventricular arrhythmias. More severely affected dogs had significantly more abnormal SAECG findings. The presence of late potentials, defined as 2 abnormal root mean square values (of 4), was associated with high sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value for cardiac-related SD or death secondary to CHF.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that SAECG is a useful noninvasive diagnostic test to evaluate dogs affected with ARVC and identify individuals at risk for cardiac-related death. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1050–1055)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the role of the phospholamban gene in purebred large-breed dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

Animals—6 dogs with DCM, including 2 Doberman Pinschers, 2 Newfoundlands, and 2 Great Danes.

Procedure—All dogs had clinical signs of congestive heart failure, and a diagnosis of DCM was made on the basis of echocardiographic findings. Blood samples were collected from each dog, and genomic DNA was isolated by a salt extraction method. Specific oligonucleotides were designed to amplify the promoter, exon 1, the 5'-part of exon 2 including the complete coding region, and part of intron 1 of the canine phospholamban gene via polymerase chain reaction procedures. These regions were screened for mutations in DNA obtained from the 6 dogs with DCM.

Results—No mutations were identified in the promoter, 5' untranslated region, part of intron 1, part of the 3' untranslated region, and the complete coding region of the phospholamban gene in dogs with DCM .

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that mutations in the phospholamban gene are not a frequent cause of DCM in Doberman Pinschers, Newfoundlands, and Great Danes. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:432–436)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research