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students are eligible to complete the NAVLE, provided their anticipated graduation date is within 10 months after the testing period. The NAVLE, overseen by the International Council for Veterinary Assessment, consists of 300 scored items relevant to an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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Introduction This time of year marks a milestone for thousands of veterinary students: It’s commencement season, and our future veterinarians will be celebrating a major life achievement. The AVMA celebrates right along with our future

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

evidence. To create meaningful strategies aimed at increasing student and practitioner interest and commitment in this area, a thorough understanding of external forces influencing recruitment of veterinary students, student career choice and job selection

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Nowhere are those realities more evident than in science careers to which veterinary students might be attracted. Although discovery-based careers are diverse and intellectually rewarding, remarkably few veterinary graduates elect to pursue them. 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Educating clients and veterinary students can be both rewarding and frustrating. In the clinic, even the best and most dedicated clients may, at times, not understand or follow our instructions for the care of their animals. In the classroom, even

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether animal factors and level of professional veterinary medical training were associated with attitudes toward pain management in animals.

Design

Exploratory, descriptive survey.

Sample Population

Students in the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences professional veterinary medical curriculum (approx 540) and clinical faculty (approx 50), house officers (approx 25), and support staff (approx 100) in the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

Procedure

A descriptive survey including demographic, descriptive, and case-based questions was distributed to participants. Participation was voluntary and survey results were anonymous.

Results

357 of 720 surveys were completed and returned (31 by faculty, 29 by staff, 18 by house officers, and 279 by students). There was a high degree of concordance among survey participants regarding the overall importance of treating pain in animals. The extent to which pain should be alleviated and animal factors, such as breed, behavior, and clinical circumstances, accounted for much of the discordance among survey groups. Fourth-year veterinary students indicated that they were occasionally less likely to treat animals for pain than were second- or third-year veterinary students.

Clinical Implications

The diversity of opinions regarding the necessity or desirability of treating pain in animals, the apparent decrease in the likelihood of senior veterinary students to treat animals for pain under certain circumstances, and evidence of knowledge deficits regarding analgesic treatments among all groups contribute to the likelihood that pain in animals will neither be consistently recognized nor appropriately treated. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:238–244)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To determine perceptions of veterinary technical and professional skills among veterinary students and recent graduates.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population—281 students and 142 recent graduates from the Ontario Veterinary College.

Procedure—A survey was designed and administered to first- through fourth-year students and veterinarians who had graduated either 1 or 6 years before survey administration.

Results—Overall response rate was 70%. Learning about technical and professional skills was highly valued. Most participants felt they had not received instruction about professional skills, but those who had felt more competent about them. Perceptions of competence increased slightly with increased comfort discussing emotional veterinary issues with instructors. Neither gender nor increased age was related to increased feelings of competence. Almost all fourth-year students felt competent and comfortable about examining an animal with the client present, assessing suffering, diagnosing parvovirus infection, performing surgery, and working as group members. However, many did not feel competent or comfortable about delivering bad news, setting time limits yet providing quality service, helping clients with limited funds make treatment decisions, dealing with demanding people, and euthanasia. Feelings of competence and comfort were closely related but were not identical.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the interests of best preparing entry-level veterinarians, technical and professional skills need to be emphasized in a learning environment where students feel comfortable discussing emotional veterinary issues. A professional skills curriculum addressing underlying selfawareness, communication, and interpersonal issues, as well as procedural matters, would likely increase the proportion of fourth-year students who feel competent and comfortable about professional skills by the end of their undergraduate training. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:924–931)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

? These complex questions continue to pose serious challenges to veterinary educators, veterinary students, and the entire veterinary profession. Answers aren't easy to come by, but we're working hard at trying to find them through the ongoing efforts of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To assess veterinary students' perceptions regarding the importance of addressing the human-animal bond in veterinary practice and their perceptions about the adequacy of curricula on the human-animal bond as presented in US veterinary colleges.

Design

Survey.

Procedure

Data were collected via a brief questionnaire mailed during the summer of 1996. Questionnaires were returned by 552 senior veterinary students representing 21 of 27 veterinary colleges in the United States.

Results

Senior veterinary students believed that the human-animal bond should be a concern of practicing veterinarians, but most did not believe they were receiving adequate instruction about the human-animal bond in their veterinary colleges. Gender was significantly related to differences in perceptions; female students appeared to have more interest in addressing the human-animal bond than male students. Students in small animal programs viewed the human-animal bond differently than those in large animal programs. Finally, students attending schools with extensive human-animal bond or human relations curricula were more likely to believe they were receiving adequate instruction in this area than students in other schools.

Conclusions and Clinical Implications

Curricula addressing the human-animal bond need to be developed and implemented in veterinary colleges in the United States. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;215:1428–1432)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association