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) for 4 days and to closely monitor the dog. Seven days after endoscopy was performed, the dog was brought to the emergency service of the veterinary medical teaching hospital. The owners reported that the dog had acutely collapsed twice, approximately

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

before breeding to confirm complete healing of the anastomosis site. Follow-up communication was made at 36 months after surgery by phone interview. At that time, the owner reported that recheck urethral endoscopy had been performed and revealed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

improvement in the health of their skin and coat, which was first noted on day 14 and persisted to the end of the study. For 1 dog with a history of allergic dermatitis, the owner reported a reduction in pruritus and a healthier-appearing coat. The second dog

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction A 4-year-old 239-g sexually intact male leucistic axolotl ( Ambystoma mexicanum ) was presented with a 2-week history of dysrexia and difficulty swallowing. The owners reported the presence of a lesion in the oral cavity but had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

food toy, was reviewed with owners at the beginning of the study, food toy compliance was not 100%, which likely affected QOL scores. Owners reported variation in how the food-dispensing toy was introduced, which may have affected the cat’s ability to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-up telephone discussion 6 months later, the owner reported that no abnormalities had been noticed since the dog was discharged. Discussion The present report described severe neurologic signs and cardiovascular collapse in a dog after ingesting ≤ 206 mg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

which those owners reported engaging in behaviors that veterinarians found stressful. Moreover, the frequency of stressful client behaviors and interactions was positively correlated with measures of veterinarian stress and burnout, which suggested

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of a topically applied gel containing essential oils (menthol and thymol) and polyphenolic antioxidants (phloretin and ferulic acid) for reducing halitosis in dogs.

Animals—20 dogs.

Procedures—A blinded crossover clinical trial was conducted. Dogs received a dental cleaning and examination (periodontal examination including periodontal probing and assessments of plaque, calculus, and gingivitis). Owners then applied a gel (active or placebo) to oral soft tissues twice daily for a 4-week period. Teeth of the dogs were cleaned again, and owners applied the other gel for a 4-week period. Clinicians scored halitosis immediately after the initial cleaning and at 4 and 8 weeks, and owners scored halitosis weekly.

Results—Halitosis assessment by clinicians revealed that both groups had improvement in halitosis scores. Two dogs were removed because of owner noncompliance. In the active-to-placebo group (n = 9), halitosis was significantly reduced during application of the active gel but increased during application of the placebo. Seven of 9 owners reported increased halitosis when treatment was changed from the active gel to the placebo. In the placebo-to-active group (n = 9), halitosis decreased during application of the placebo and continued to decrease during application of the active gel. Seven of 9 owners reported a decrease in halitosis with the active gel.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An oral topically applied gel with essential oils and polyphenolic antioxidants applied daily after an initial professional dental cleaning decreased oral malodor in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether pedometers can be used to measure physical activity in dogs.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—26 dogs.

Procedure—To determine pedometer accuracy, number of steps recorded with the pedometer as dogs walked, trotted, and ran for a distance of approximately 30 m (100 ft) at each gait was compared with actual number of steps. Dogs and owners then wore pedometers for 7 to 14 days, and dog pedometer output was compared with body condition score, owner-reported activity of the dog, and owner pedometer output.

Results—Most owners classified their dogs as active or quite active and indicated that their dogs exercised 3 to 7 days/wk. For all dogs, body condition score was 5, 6, or 7 on a scale from 1 to 9. At a walk, pedometers overestimated actual number of steps by approximately 17% in large and medium dogs and underestimated actual number of steps by approximately 7% in small dogs. No significant differences between pedometer-recorded and actual number of steps were detected when dogs trotted or ran. Number of steps per day for the dogs was significantly correlated with owner-reported activity of the dog (r = 0.305) and number of steps per day for the owners (r = 0.469) and was inversely correlated with body condition score (r = −0.554).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that pedometers can measure physical activity in dogs with reasonable accuracy. A lower number of steps per day was associated with a higher body condition score, and less active owners generally had less active dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:2010–2015)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Questionnaires regarding the use of prostaglandin F and its analogues (hereafter referred to as pg) were sent to 332 Alabama beef cattle owners and to 279 Alabama dairy cattle owners after attempting to contact them by telephone to request their participation in the survey. Questionnaires concerning the use of pg in their clients’ herds were likewise sent to 147 food animal and mixed animal practitioners in Alabama after attempting telephone contact. Response among beef cattle owners, dairy cattle owners, and veterinarians to whom questionnaires were mailed was 64.5, 61.6, and 75.5%, respectively.

Only 7.4% (13 of 175) of respondent beef cattle owners reported use of pg in their herds, and this use was predominantly for artificial insemination and embryo transfer. In contrast, 66.5% (109 of 164) of respondent dairy cattle owners reported use of pg, generally with satisfactory results, for some of the following conditions: unobserved estrus (n = 77), uterine infections (n = 74), retained placenta (n = 65), cystic ovaries (n = 56), estrus synchronization (n = 45), and induction of parturition (n = 13).

Although 94.9% of respondent veterinarians treated cattle with pg, those attending beef herds thought that more important strategies were available for improvement of beef cattle productivity than increased use of pg. Among these strategies were shorter calving seasons, improved nutrition, better record keeping, more frequent herd health visits, improved animal identification, and increased use of bull breeding soundness examinations. Likewise, dairy practitioners thought that improved estrus detection, more frequent herd health visits, improved nutrition, better artificial insemination technique, and improved record keeping were more important for improved production than was increased use of pg.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association