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–contrast-enhanced CT to identify DDF tendinopathy in the affected digit of lame horses. Materials and Methods Case selection The radiologic information system of the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine was searched to identify horses

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Lameness resulting from osteoarthritis and other joint diseases is the most common performance-limiting problem in horses. 1–3 Common treatments include rest, intra-articular administration of corticosteroids, and administration of NSAIDs and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Diagnostic anesthesia is an essential part of most lameness examinations for horses, but interpretation of diagnostic anesthesia is often confusing when a nerve block results in only amelioration rather than resolution of lameness. When that

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Lameness is a common problem in horses. Equine veterinarians are often called upon to diagnose the source of lameness and institute appropriate treatment to return horses to soundness promptly. A lameness examination typically

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the association between subjective lameness grades and kinetic gait parameters and assess the variability in kinetic parameters in horses with experimentally induced forelimb lameness.

Animals—32 horses.

Procedures—Forelimb lameness was induced in each horse via injection of lipopolysaccharide into 1 metacarpophalangeal joint (40 experimental trials). Subjective lameness grading and 13 kinetic gait parameters (force plate analysis) were assessed before (baseline) and at 12, 18, and 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide injection. While horses were trotting, kinetic gait analysis was performed for 8 valid repetitions at each time point. Repeated-measures analyses were performed with 8 repetitions for each kinetic parameter as the outcome, and lameness grades, time points after lipopolysaccharide injection, and repetition order as explanatory variables. Sensitivity and specificity of kinetic parameters for classification of horses as sound or lame (in relation to subjective lameness scores) were calculated. Between- and within-horse variabilities of the 13 kinetic parameters were assessed by calculation of coefficients of variation.

Results—Subjective lameness grades were significantly associated with most of the kinetic parameters. Vertical force peak and impulse had the lowest between- and within-horse coefficients of variation and the highest correlations with subjective lameness grade. Vertical force peak had the highest sensitivity and specificity for lameness classification. Vertical force peak and impulse were significantly decreased even in horses with mild or unobservable lameness.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Among the kinetic gait parameters, vertical force peak and impulse had the best potential to reflect lameness severity and identify subclinical forelimb gait abnormalities. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1805–1815)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

limb lameness after a loss of at least 11% of body weight. 23 Weight loss, physical modalities, and exercise programs can lead to increased muscle strength and endurance, increased joint ROM, decreased signs of pain and muscle spasm, and improved

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 12-year-old Quarter Horse gelding was examined for bilateral forelimb lameness of 5 years' duration that had increasingly worsened over 4 months, especially when the horse was on hard ground. Previous treatments including corrective

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To study the role of head movements in lame horses.

Sample Population

11 Dutch Warmblood horses.

Procedure

A 2-segment 2-dimensional inverse dynamic model of trotting horses was developed: trunk and head/neck segment joined in a neck joint. Model input consisted of averaged segmental inertial properties and averaged kinematic data, taken from 11 horses, trotting on a treadmill (3.5 m/s) in 3 conditions of induced lameness: sound, mildly lame, and moderately lame. Dynamic and static effects were analyzed.

Results

Dynamic effects were found to be considerably larger than static effects. In the moderately lame condition, the maximal neck joint vertical force during the lame stance phase had a 27% decrease, compared with the sound situation. Neck joint sagittal torque and maximal vertical force on the trunk decreased by 31 and 13%, respectively. Load distribution between forelimb and hind limb indicated a relative load shift from the lame forelimb to the diagonal hind limb during the lame stance phase. The sound contralateral forelimb carried a higher load while the ipsilateral hind limb was unloaded.

Conclusion

It could be concluded that asymmetric head movements have a major role in lameness compensation, which can be explained by inertial interaction between trunk and head/neck segment. Static effects, such as caudad shifting of the body center of mass, are of minor importance.

Clinical Relevance

This report clarifies the mechanism of lameness compensation and the method of lameness diagnosis. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:713–718)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

receptor antagonist) and a proprietary PLA 2 inhibitor to attenuate lameness in dogs with sodium urate–induced synovitis. The effectiveness of perzinfotel and the PLA 2 inhibitor was evaluated by use of clinical and GRF assessments of lameness

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

effect of CCT on signs of postoperative pain, swelling, range of motion of the stifle joint, and lameness in dogs after TPLO. We hypothesized that dogs that received CCT following TPLO would have less pain, swelling, and lameness and would have a greater

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association