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History A 6-month-old 93-kg (205-lb) Duroc gilt was evaluated for a 1-month history of a grade 3/5 lameness of the left forelimb. Physical examination revealed moderate effusion of the left shoulder joint. Survey radiography ( Figure 1 ) was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
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inspiratory and expiratory dyspnea. Radiography of the thorax revealed a perihilar interstitial pattern and moderate pleural effusion. Increased radiopacity obscured the cardiac silhouette. Abnormalities detected on a CBC included nonregenerative anemia (Hct

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

structure. Detail of the abdominal organs is difficult to ascertain, suggesting the presence of peritoneal effusion. The intestinal tract is displaced caudodorsally. Differential diagnoses included regional peritonitis secondary to gastrointestinal tract

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; however, adventitious breath sounds were not detected. Both eyes were affected with severe uveitis, and the conjunctival mucosae were characterized by petechial hemorrhages. Moderate effusion was detected in both tibiotarsal joints, but no signs of pain or

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mineralizations of the mesentery. There is a lack of serosal detail in the ventral portion of the abdomen, which is consistent with focal peritonitis, carcinomatosis, or abdominal effusion ( Figure 2 ). Figure 2— Same radiographic images as in Figure 1

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

appeared to be inserting on the tibial tuberosity. A moderate amount of anechoic intra-articular fluid was seen, consistent with synovial effusion. The almost complete lack of linear fibers at the level of the tibial tuberosity is consistent with severe

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with absence of joint effusion ( Figure 2 ). These radiographic changes are consistent with an aggressive bone lesion, and differential diagnoses include bacterial or mycotic osteomyelitis, primary bone tumor, and metastatic bone tumor. Figure 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

can develop spontaneously or as a complication of trauma, pleural effusion, or lobectomy. Clinical signs and hematologic data are not specific for lung lobe torsion; therefore, imaging is critical to the diagnosis. 3 Radiography remains the primary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

intrapericardial), pericardial effusion, peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH), and dilated cardiomyopathy. Figure 2— Same images as in Figure 1 . A large, smoothly marginated soft tissue mass effaces the cranioventral margins of the cardiac

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

bronchovesicular sounds bilaterally. The cat was tachycardic with pale mucous membranes and weak femoral pulses. Evaluation of a fluid sample obtained by diagnostic thoracocentesis revealed a nonclotting hemorrhagic effusion with a PCV of 18% and total solids

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association