Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 78 items for :

  • "urine culture" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

explanatory variables (eg, age, results of bacterial urine culture, rectal temperature, pyuria, hematuria, and bacteriuria) were included in the model as continuous explanatory variables. Dogs with disease were suballocated into various disease categories, and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, phosphorus, albumin, cholesterol, and anion gap), symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), urinalysis and urine culture. In dogs with a positive urine bacterial culture, the decision to treat with antimicrobials was based on laboratory findings and any changes in

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. The owners reported the urine was malodorous, but no signs of pollakiuria, stranguria, or hematuria were seen. Both SUB devices flushed normally. Results of a urinalysis revealed inactive sediment, and urine culture results were negative for aerobic

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/dL) with bacterial growth on urine culture. Abdominal ultrasonography showed no evidence of urinary tract obstruction. Renal injury was attributed to pyelonephritis, which resolved with IV fluid therapy and antimicrobial treatment. At the time of follow

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Author:

of age with periuria are reported to have urinary tract infections identified by culture. 8,11,22 Because of this, antimicrobial treatment was neither warranted nor in keeping with good antimicrobial stewardship without a positive urine culture

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a CBC, serum biochemical analysis, coagulation profile, urinalysis, and microbial urine culture. To delineate the organ of origination of the thoracic mass, ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT of the thorax were recommended. Given the suspicion

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was treated IV with amoxicillin–clavulanic acid (20 mg/kg [9.1 mg/lb], q 8 h) and an anti-inflammatory dosage of dexamethasone (0.15 mg/kg/d [0.07 mg/lb/d]) while results of serologic testing and blood and urine cultures were pending. At first

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variety of reasons including recurrent UTIs, recessed vulvas have been reported in between 36% and 69% of cases. 2 , 3 A large retrospective study 4 of 1,636 urine culture results collected from 1,028 dogs found that recessed vulvas were the most common

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2004 ; 34 : 923 – 933 . 10.1016/j.cvsm.2004.03.001 3. Lulich JP , Osborne CA . Urine culture as a test for cure: why, when, and how? Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 2004 ; 34 : 1027 – 1041 . 10

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

prescribed with follow-up urine culture recommended 7 to 10 days after treatment started, but a culture was not performed. One week after antimicrobial administration began, no change in urinary incontinence was observed, and the caregiver was advised to

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association