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training speed induces deposition of new bone. 1 Whereas the adaptation of some biological tissues to loading has been investigated, less is known about the adaptive capabilities of the structures that make up an important inner layer of the hoof wall

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the dorsum of the hoof wall), phalangeal rotation, distal displacement of the DP, and combined rotation and displacement events. 7 Various radiographic measurements have been used to document these pathological changes. This has resulted in the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

pressure palmarly (or plantarly), but results of a study 5 in which a 59% increase in lateral hoof wall strain resulted from a 15° to 20° heel elevation suggest that severe wedging may be detrimental to successful laminitis treatment. Increasing the weight

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-phenytoin solution. Gross Findings On postmortem examination, lesions of the coronary bands, hoof walls, and frogs of all 4 feet were similar. Coronary bands were circumferentially thickened and covered in dry to moist, yellow-white hyperkeratotic scale

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sloughing of the hoof walls in cattle—at least some of which having been fed zilpaterol hydrochloride—with a mixture of curiosity and exasperation. The exasperation arises from the fact that, to my knowledge, no one has come forward with a reasonable

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

methacrylate prosthesis to protect hoof wall defects in cattle with exposed corium has also been described as a potential treatment. 1 , 5 A Holstein bull with exungulation of a hoof secondary to foot-and-mouth disease was successfully treated with autologous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

material covered the distal hoof wall, thereby molding the material to the shape of the foot. Each sequential wrap was placed directly on top of the first. The hoof of the right forelimb was supported by packing the sole with impression material. e

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

loaded immediately after transport to the laboratory and served as the control specimen. The limbs were disarticulated at the distal interphalangeal joint, the hoof was positioned with the dorsal hoof wall perpendicular to the ground, and the force

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

reported concerns about nonambulatory or slow and difficult-to-move cattle and cattle that sloughed hoof walls. Although anecdotal evidence generated concern that cattle fed the β-adrenergic receptor agonist zilpaterol were at increased risk, the condition

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

,6 General shoeing practice is to place nails within the dorsal half of a hoof to allow for expansion of the heels during the stance phase and limb loading. 7 Because a horseshoe is stiffer than the hoof wall, heel expansion during loading would result in

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research