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History A 3-year-old 4.43-kg sexually intact male Bengal cat that was indoor only was presented by a rescue organization for evaluation of a previously diagnosed heart murmur in preparation for routine castration. The cat was surrendered to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 17-year-old Boston Terrier was evaluated because of a loud heart murmur detected during auscultation by a veterinarian. The dog did not have clinical signs of illness. The only physical examination abnormality was a loud systolic heart murmur

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

records from the referring veterinarian indicated that a loud left-sided heart murmur was auscultated (murmur timing was not documented). This heart murmur decreased in intensity and was no longer present by 6 months of age. The patient had a recent

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 2-year-old castrated male domestic shorthair cat with a history of a heart murmur since adoption at 5 months of age was referred for echocardiography before anesthesia for surgical treatment of an infected wound. The wound had

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

%]). Median age at cardiac-related death was 23.4 months, with no significant difference between dogs and cats. However, median survival time was shorter for animals with no or a low-grade heart murmur (3.4 months) than for those with a higher-grade heart

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, glucocorticoids, and NSAIDs. The sudden onset of a loud right-sided heart murmur prompted referral for further evaluation. At the time of admission, the horse was quiet and alert and afebrile, with mild sinus tachycardia (heart rate, 52 beats/min) and pale pink

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

incidentally detected heart murmurs in dogs and cats Incidentally detected heart murmurs represent murmurs detected unexpectedly during an examination that was not initially focused on the cardiovascular system. Successful management of incidentally detected

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 15-year-old 5.4-kg (11.9-lb) neutered male Maine Coon cat was evaluated because of a heart murmur and bradycardia. The cat had a history of weight loss and reduction in appetite of 4 to 6 weeks' duration. On physical examination, the cat's heart

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, tachycardia, fever, tachypnea, and weight loss. In addition, a heart murmur had been recently detected. Clinical Findings Upon evaluation, the mare was in poor body condition (body condition score, 3/9) and had ventral edema, pale mucous membranes, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of oral infection did not differ between groups. Dogs with endocarditis were significantly more likely to have undergone a nonoral surgical procedure in the previous 3 months or to have developed a new heart murmur or a change in intensity of an

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association